• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

Physics Investigation: How does insulation effect the loss of heat

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Physics Investigation: How does insulation effect the loss of heat? In this investigation I am going to try and find out what difference it makes if you wrap newspaper round a beaker with hot water in it and see if the heat loss is different with different thickness layers of newspaper. I carried out a preliminary experiment and found out that by only increasing the layers of thickness by 1 layer each time, that wont make enough difference to make a good graph because the trends will be too similar. So I chose to increase the layers by five sheets each time. Apparatus: * Beaker * Stopwatch * Newspaper * Polystyrene * Thermometer * Kettle * Stand and clamp I will also take a number of safety precautions whilst conducting the investigation. I will ensure the kettle is used safely through out the experiment, and hot water is transferred securely. . I will use protection when handling the boiling tubes when the hot water is present. ...read more.

Middle

I will change the layers of newspapers on the beaker. I will get 6 beakers. I will record two at a time. I will put polystyrene on the top and bottom of the beakers when I have filled the beakers up with 150 ml of boiling water. There is a little hole in the polystyrene on the top of the beaker to stick the thermometer through. I will then take results every five minutes for a total of 30 minutes. There will be 6 readings taken for each newspaper layer range. I will record 6 different layers. 0 layers, 5 layers, 10 layers, 15 layers, 20 layers and 25 layers. This should give me a good range of results. I predict that the more layers of newspaper round the beaker, the less quickly the water will lose heat. I say these because the more layers there are the more air pockets there are to keep the heat in. If there are more air pockets the more hot air is trapped in the newspaper. ...read more.

Conclusion

60 61 62 64 63 64 18 59 61 61 63 63 63 19 59 60 60 62 62 62 20 58 59 59 61 62 62 21 57 59 58 60 61 62 22 56 58 57 60 60 61 23 55 57 57 59 59 60 24 55 56 56 58 58 59 25 54 55 55 57 58 58 Analysing evidence and conclusion: My results went down in a good trend. All apart from the 25 layers which cooled quicker than the 20 layers. All the results are clear that they gradually decrease in the graph, In a fairly straight line. The more they are insulated, the slower the temperature falls. It is because the newspaper traps air in between it and the beaker, this insulates the beaker and traps hot air from escaping. Evaluation: My results were good. I conclude that the more layers around the beaker, the slower the temperature falls. I could have measured the results more accurately, by taking more time and recording each result twice but I didn't have time. By William malbon. Physics coursework.doc - 2 - 20/03/02 ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE Green Plants as Organisms section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE Green Plants as Organisms essays

  1. Marked by a teacher

    Investigate the effect of huddling on heat loss.

    5 star(s)

    The differences between the inner and outer test tubes within the huddles was at least 1.375�C, as in the case of the 10-huddle. The difference between the inner and outer test tube of the 7-huddle was 1.625�C. The hypothesis that the greater the size of the huddle, the lower the

  2. Marked by a teacher

    An investigation into the effect of a germination inhibitor on the germination of seeds.

    3 star(s)

    Averages are needed for the 'Group Data' Chi-squared; 2 sets of chi-squared tests are being carried out 'individual data' (my own results) and 'group data' (the average results of the 6 people). An average has to be used so that the data is around the same as the Individual Data, therefore comparisons can be made.

  1. An Investigation into Water Loss from Plants.

    Leave to dry for 10 minutes. * Carefully peel off using scalpel and place on slide. * Place slide under microscope and place graticule on top of it. * Use graticule to measure the area of view and then count the number of stomata in this area.

  2. An Investigation into Species Diversity with distance along a Pingo.

    The general adaptation for this can be seen in the root hair. The root hair is 'very thin extension of the cells that make up the outer layer or epidermis of a root' (Cambridge, Biology 1). They increase the surface area of the root with the soil, so more water can be taken into the plant by osmosis.

  1. Yeast Investigation

    We set up our apparatus like this for specific reasons. The tin foil that we wrapped around the beaker containing the heated water was put in place so that the water would not loose as much heat as it would without insulation.

  2. Bouncing balls: Physics coursework

    to see the differences in bounce height because the numbers are well spaced. I will heat the ball in water as I have found it the easiest and most efficient way to heat the ball. To measure the bounce height I will put my head level to the point where I think the ball will bounce.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work