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physics lab- moment

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Physics Lab:Determining Weight of Metre Rule

Aim:
To verify the weight of a metre rule using the principal of moments.

Background:
A torque (τ) in
physics, also called a moment (of force) measures the tendency of a force to rotate an object about some axis (center). The magnitude of a torque is defined as the product of a force and the length of the lever arm (radius). Just as a force is a push or a pull, a torque can be thought of as a twist. The SI unit for torque is the Newton meter (N m). The symbol for torque is τ, the Greek letter tau. The principle of moments is:

f (1)

...read more.

Middle

Trial 2

0.90

0.75

0.75

0.85

0.80

0.80

0.80

0.85

0.85

0.75

0.90

0.90

0.70

1.00

0.95

0.65

1.05

1.00

0.60

1.15

1.15

0.55

1.25

1.25

0.50

1.30

1.30

Processed Data-
                         Table of Readings using 1/d Formula

1/d (+/- 0.01cm)

...read more.

Conclusion

image02.pngimage01.png

Graph:
Done Behind

Conclusion & Analysis:
From the experiment, I can conclude that the weight of the metre rule is 1.61N. Also, force is inversely proportional to the distance from the pivot. From the graph, which is positive, we get the gradient as image03.png

Evaluation:

Errors:

  • The mass of the string was not taken into account but would have affected overall results.
  • The newton rule was not completely accurate. Thus, I should have used two and averaged the results.
  • Parallax error could have occurred during measurements and readings.

Fair Test:
 The pivot was kept at 1cm from the retort stand during all
    the trials.

Safe Test:
There was no need for any safety equipment or precautions during the experiment.

0.70

0.75

0.80

0.85

0.90

Distance (m) {±0.01m

0.900

0.850

0.800

0.750

0.700


...read more.

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