• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

Propanone reacts with Iodine slowly at room temperature. This reaction can be faster if we add Hydrochloric acid (HCl, a catalyst).

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Chemistry Investigation Planning: Propanone reacts with Iodine slowly at room temperature. This reaction can be faster if we add Hydrochloric acid (HCl, a catalyst). The chemical equation of my reaction is: * I2 + CH3COCH3 ICH2COCH3 + HI Different factors that affect the rate of any reaction are: 1. The temperature of the reaction 2. The use of a catalyst 3. The surface area 4. Pressure * In my case pressure and surface area are not considered to be relevant. Pressure would only affect reactions involving gases, same for surface area where the reaction must be between solids. In order for a reaction to take place ions must first collide. Though collision only is not enough they need a catalyst to speed up the collision resulting in a faster rate of reaction. In my experiment I am going to investigate the effect of the Hydrochloric acid (HCl) concentration on the rate of the reaction. I expect the reaction to be faster as the concentration of Hydrochloric acid increases. The more molecules of HCl there are, the more often they will collide, and therefore the quicker the rate of the reaction will be. ...read more.

Middle

RESULTS: These were my results on the first day: Volume of HCl (cm3) Volume of Water (cm3) Time (Seconds) 4 0 294 3.5 0.5 391 3 1 404 2.5 1.5 468 2 2 563 1 3 1173 Since the same concentration of Propanone and Iodine has been used in all my experiments, I did not include them in the table. These results were about what I predicted. I have noticed the following based on my results: 1. Time increases by decreasing the concentration of Hydrochloric acid. 2. If we decrease the concentration to a half, the time doubles. For example, a concentration of 4 cm3 of HCl takes 294 seconds, if this volume decreases to 2 cm3 of HCl and 2 cm3 of water (which will decrease the concentration), the time increases to 563 seconds, which in other words is 4:54 min to 9:23 min respectively. Therefore the time almost doubled as the concentration is halved. The following were my results on the second day: Volume of HCl (cm3) Volume of Water (cm3) Time (Seconds) 4 0 430 3.5 0.5 455 3 1 501 2.5 1.5 587 2 2 755 1 3 1343 These results were noticeably different than those of the first day. ...read more.

Conclusion

This can be done if I put the solutions with there test tubes in a beaker full of water, and measure the temperature of the water to make sure the reaction is carried in constant temperature. In case the water gets colder the beaker could be heated until it returns back to normal temperature. If it gets hotter ice cubes could be added to the water in the beaker to make it colder. In order for me to obtain more accurate results I can re-do the experiment, but this time checking another variable, such as the temperature. If I was to do that I will have to keep the concentration of the solutions constant this time, and control the temperature using: a Bunsen burner, ice cubes, and most importantly a thermometer that is going to be used to record my readings. When heating the solutions I cannot expose the test tubes to direct fire, they have to be put in a beaker full of water, otherwise I wont be able to take readings, as the thermometer will break. I can then compare these results to mine and see if increasing the temperature also speeds up the rate of a reaction, as I expect to do or not. Mohamed El Sherif Y11A Chemistry Investigation Dr. Parker Al Alsson School ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE Patterns of Behaviour section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE Patterns of Behaviour essays

  1. Rates of Reaction - The Iodine Clock

    (1) Independent variable: Volume Potassium Iodide Controlled variables: Volume Thiosulphate Volume Hydrogen Peroxide Volume Sulphuric Acid Temperature Total solution volume Volume starch Pressure Dependent variable: Time Expt. (2) Independent variable: Volume Hydrogen Peroxide Controlled variables: Volume Thiosulphate Volume Potassium Iodide Volume Sulphuric Acid Temperature Total solution volume Volume starch Pressure Dependent variable: Time Expt.

  2. The Iodine Clock Investigation

    The Effect of Temperature on the Rate of Reaction As the temperature of a reaction rises, the average speeds of reacting particles also increase. At high temperatures there are more collisions per second and this results in an increase in the rate of the reaction.

  1. The Iodine Clock

    But you can see that when the concentration of both potassium iodide and ammonium persulphate is doubled the time is halved e.g. When all the substances are the same it took 451 seconds, but when the amount of potassium iodide was doubled the time the experiment took dropped to 145 seconds which is nearly half the time.

  2. Investigate the following hypothesises; Males have a faster reaction time than females, and People ...

    Before asking them to catch a 30cm ruler with their thumb and forefinger, which will be measured 1cm apart either side of the ruler in order to stop people having an unfair advantage therefore hindering any bias results. I will then drop the ruler without any notification and let the subject catch the ruler with their thumb and forefinger.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work