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Prove that "Frictional Forces are Surface dependant".

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

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We were given a coursework question asking us to prove that “Frictional Forces are Surface dependant”. We were asked to prove this. I have therefore thought of several ways to do so;

  • I thought of throwing different objects across different surfaces.
  • I thought of using an elastic band to throw a block of wood, 4.5cm X 4.5cm x 4.5cm, across a certain surface with a certain length; 1.25 metres. I thought of making the surface as my independent variable and the block of wood as my dependant variable.
  • I also thought of performing the above procedure but instead of using different types of surfaces, I thought I would use several types of blocks of different material, but all of the same weight. And using the rubber band, throw it across a surface of ceramic.

I have decided to merge the two ideas, and came up with the following idea and procedure;

My idea was that I could use two 5cm x 5cm x 5cm blocks, one of wood, and the second of plastic foam. I intend to try them on several different types of surface; wood, ceramic, marble, carpet (with a certain thickness which I shall state later on), and glass. All of which are 1.00metres (100cm) in length. I intend to use the surfaces as my independent variables, and the blocks as my dependant variables. I intend to prove that the type of surface, makes a lot of difference in the velocity (speed) of the block, and that due to friction and the surface, the distance covered, and the time consumed change according to the type of surface, and whether it has a high frictional surface or a low frictional surface?

...read more.

Middle

0.24

0.22

0.22

45

20

0.29

0.28

0.31

0.29

69

0.34

0.35

0.29

0.32

63

30

0.4

0.42

0.39

0.4

75

0.38

0.41

0.4

0.396

76

40

0.51

0.5

0.53

0.52

77

0.49

0.51

0.52

0.51

78.4

50

0.72

0.68

0.71

0.7

71

0.72

0.65

0.68

0.68

73.5

60

0.85

0.88

0.91

0.88

68

0.86

0.89

0.91

0.89

67.4

70

0.96

1.05

1.1

1.04

65

STOPPED

STOPPED

STOPPED

STOPPED

STOPPED

80

STOPPED

STOPPED

STOPPED

STOPPED

STOPPED

STOPPED

STOPPED

STOPPED

STOPPED

STOPPED

90

STOPPED

STOPPED

STOPPED

STOPPED

STOPPED

STOPPED

STOPPED

STOPPED

STOPPED

STOPPED

100

STOPPED

STOPPED

STOPPED

STOPPED

STOPPED

STOPPED

STOPPED

STOPPED

STOPPED

STOPPED

After observing the results I have obtained and placed in the above table, and with reference to my notes and annotations which I have produced during the investigation, I found that the block of wood, would only reach a certain distance, that is of course due to the thrust (force applied), but as I have followed my initial plan step by step, altering only what I have stated previously, I could not alter anything else or make any extra modifications. I was therefore stuck with the rubber band I had started with. As is noticeable; in the first table which is for the marble, the block stopped at the marker indicating 70cm, and did not proceed. While in the second table which is for the wooden surface, the block reached the mark which indicated 60cm, and did not proceed. This I shall analyse in the following section and state the reasons for.

        Unfortunately, this investigation was not easy; this is mainly because not every time I let go of the rubber band did  the block reach the required mark, and before stating that the block stopped, I did and re-did the experiment to ensure that the block could not indeed reach that level (mark). Sometimes I would also let go of the rubber band before starting the stop-watch. I have therefore tried my best to obtain and use the most reliable results possible. I have followed my procedure step by step, and I have also used the equipment I am most familiar with, and that’s to enable me to cope with and provide the best results attainable by the aid of this equipment. I hope that these results are sufficient, and that they will enable me to prove my theory and prediction.

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Conclusion

We also notice that there is a semi-anomaly; the result fir the 30cm is slightly out of line, it is slightly lower than where it should be, this could be due to one of the external factors that I have stated previously, or it could be due to some other factor that I have been unable to identify using the tools available to us.

        I have tried my best to identify the factors which could have affected my investigation and consequently, my results. That is of course with the equipment provided to us. If there are any other factors which I have failed to identify, that would be because of the tools provided to us. Though, I doubt that there are any other factors that could be identified using other apparatus.

        Overall, I believe that I have performed this investigation to a good standard, and that I have succeeded in proving my theory and prediction. I also believe that I have done what was asked of me, and proved that frictional forces are surface dependant. I have proved it with reference to my knowledge, to external, advanced information, and also with reference to my investigation. Though I have performed this investigation to a fairly good standard, I believe that it could be better and that by performing this investigation again after altering the errors I have stated above, I would be able to provide sufficient evidence and proof which is undoubted and accurate by 99%. I say this because no matter how hard I try, the equipment provided to us are not that advanced, and therefore, there will always be better methods with results which are more accurate than what I have obtained. I have therefore performed this investigation as best as I could, and hope that the results and information I have gathered are sufficient.

Karim Hatem Abou Ahmed

Year 10

GCSE Physics

Science Department

...read more.

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