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rate of reaction

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Introduction

GCSE Chemistry Coursework- An Investigation in to the Effect of Concentration on the Rate of Reaction Aim Our aim was to find out whether concentration had an affect on the rate of a reaction by reacting different concentrations of hydrochloric acid with magnesium ribbon. Background Information In my experiment I will be investigating the effect of concentration on the rate of reaction between Hydrochloric acid (HCl) and Magnesium ribbon (Mg). Concentration is a very common concept used in chemistry and other walks of life. It is the measure of how many molecules of a given substance there are in a unit volume. In the case of chemical substances it refers to the amount of solute dissolved in a solvent. Concentration is expressed as moles/cubic meter. For a successful reaction to take place between the molecules of different substances they must collide with each other with sufficient force to bring them close together so that they can react. The collision theory of reaction in any concentration is as follows. In a reaction where one of both reactants are in low concentration the particles are spread out and will collide with each other less often resulting in fewer successful collisions. In a reaction where one or both reactants are in high concentration the particles are crowded close together and will collide with each other more often, resulting in an increased number of successful collisions. ...read more.

Middle

6. Repeat the experiment three times for each different concentration of acid. Preliminary Fair Test To keep my test fair I will use the same amount of all three acids and the same measurements of magnesium ribbon to achieve a correct set of results. I will also operate my practical at room temperature 26�C (at the time of the experiment). Also I will use the same amount of water in the trough to not alter my results. I will be using the same type of bung, measuring cylinder delivery tube and conical flask. Diagram Results Concentration Time taken to achieve 20, 40, 60, 80, 100cm� of Hydrogen (sec) 20cm� 40cm� 60cm� 80cm� 100cm� Preliminary 1molar 11.03 22.07 28.66 40.92 59.07 Preliminary 1.5molar 5.12 9.15 14.85 16.85 24.3 Preliminary 2molar 4.04 7.3 10.56 14.7 20.7 Graph The graph shows that for example the time taken to produce 100cm� of hydrogen is 20seconds for the 2 molar solution, 1.5 molar it took 24seconds and 59 seconds for the 1 molar solution. Preliminary Analysis My preliminary experiment went very well producing one minor anomaly which was at 1.5 moles where it took a lot quicker to achieve 100cm� than I predicted which I think at the time was due to the area I was working in. ...read more.

Conclusion

I find most of the points are on a steady curve upwards. I improved the accuracy of my experiment by taking three readings for every concentration and taking the average values. I made sure that I tried my best to ensure that all the variables except the concentration where kept the same. I made sure the bung was fixed tight to ensure that none of the hydrogen gas produced during the reaction was lost. I made sure I used the correct protective equipment to ensure my safety. Evaluation I am quite satisfied that I carried out the investigation properly as a result of which the graphs prove my original prediction. I noticed that because the reaction between hydrochloric acid and magnesium wash exothermic the temperature of the acid went up. Since the temperature can also affect the rate of reaction if I had the opportunity I would like to investigate whether this increase in temperature affected the rate of reaction. I feel that in addition to measuring out the magnesium ribbon by its length I should have also kept a record of the actual weight of the ribbon to ensure that I was always using the same amount of magnesium. GCSE coursework Nathan Atkinson Chemistry GCSE coursework Nathan Atkinson Chemistry ...read more.

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