• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

Rate of Reaction Between, Hydrochloric Acid and Magnesium

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Rate of Reaction Between, Hydrochloric Acid and Magnesium Aim I aim the find out whether the concentration of acid effects the amount of gas given off in a set amount of time between hydrochloric acid magnesium ribbon. Prediction I predict that the higher the concentration, the quicker the gas will be given off. The atomic collision theory describes how the reaction quickens. I looked up the collision theory in a textbook "Science in Action", and found the following information. The collision theory explains how a reaction can only take place when reactive particles meet, under certain conditions. It stands to reason that if you have more reactive acid particles (a higher concentration of particles) in the same place, they are more likely to collide with another particle, and react. However, other aspects also affect the reaction, but are all made more likely if there are more molecules. For the molecules to react they have to have * Enough energy to achieve an activated complex. This energy that they need is activation energy. * The right orientation for the reaction to take place. ] Also, when these reactions take place quickly, the produce a lot of heat, so if the reactions do happen more quickly with the stronger acid, they will be quickened still be the increase in heat. This increase in energy makes the particles vibrate quicker, and therefore collide with other particles, again increasing there chance of reaction. ...read more.

Middle

40 17 19 22 19.33333333 50 19 23 22 21.33333333 60 19 23 22 21.33333333 70 19 23 22 21.33333333 5 7 12 13 10.66666667 10 13 18 19 16.66666667 15 16 19 19 18 2 20 19 19 19 19 25 19 19 19 19 30 19 19 19 19 35 19 19 19 19 2 10 8 7 8.333333333 4 15 15 15 15 6 19 21 21 20.33333333 8 21 21 21 21 2.5 10 21 21 21 21 12 21 21 21 21 14 21 21 21 21 16 21 21 21 21 It is difficult to see any trend using only a table so I have produced a graph that held all the data: As you can see from the graph, the time at which the reaction stopped is more or less the same ml3. This is because I used the same amount of magnesium, and the same amount of acid, so I will get the same amount of hydrogen, no matter how strong the acid is. You can also see from the graph the speed at which the reactions took place. 0.5 moles being the slowest and 2.5 being the quickest. This proves my prediction that the stronger the acid, the quicker the reaction The collision theory explains how a reaction can only take place when reactive particles meet, under certain conditions. It stands to reason that if you have more reactive acid particles (a higher concentration of particles) ...read more.

Conclusion

gas is given off, between hydrochloric acid magnesium ribbon" and because the results are what I expected, and I carried out the experiment with care, also the fact that I repeated the experiment many times, it is reasonable to presume that I can draw a simple conclusion like, "the higher the concentration, the quicker the gas will be given off " If I were to do the experiment again I would change the way I inserted the magnesium into the flask. I think I would have a double chambered flask that would be able to have the wall removed. See diagram. I could combine this idea with the alternative way I could do the experiment, as described in my planning. The method would be to: Place magnesium and the acid in a flask, which is then plugged with cotton wool, to prevent any liquid splashing out, during the reaction. Next, the flask is weighed, then tipped up to let the reactants mix and a clock is started. The mass is noted at regular intervals, until the reaction is complete. I would use the same volumes for all the chemicals in the new experiment, as I see no good reason changing them. I would expect the graph for the result to be much the same, but obviously with different axis labels and values. For example In conclusion, the experiment did prove my prediction that the rate of reaction doubles with when the acid strength doubles. Daniel Hill 10S Rate of Reaction Between.doc Page 1 of 8 ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE Patterns of Behaviour section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE Patterns of Behaviour essays

  1. Marked by a teacher

    Investigation of the rate of reaction between Magnesium and Hydrochloric acid

    4 star(s)

    using a gas syringe that has divisions of 1cm� as this will allow more accurate recordings. 100ml Measuring Cylinder As I will need to guarantee the amount of hydrochloric acid in the conical flask in every experiment is 50ml, and hence using a measuring cylinder that only measures up to 50ml would cause the acid to overflow.

  2. Marked by a teacher

    For my experiment I am finding out the effects on the reaction rate when ...

    3 star(s)

    confident that there are no catalysts which affect the rate of reaction. In my method I did not measure the mass of the magnesium but instead I measured the length of magnesium ribbon needed using a 30cm ruler and cut it using scissors.

  1. How does changing the concentration of the Hydrochloric acid affect it reactions with Magnesium?

    of a change, this could be because of our human error, there should be a big change in the amount given off. This table shows a nice spread of results throughout the range of concentration. It clearly shows that the reaction is at different stages so is therefore producing different amounts of H2.

  2. Investigating the rate of reaction between Magnesium Ribbon and Hydrochloric Acid.

    It is a positive correlation in direct proportion. This again proves my prediction as the rate of reaction is shown to increase when the concentration increases. EVALUATION: Overall I'm relatively pleased with my results and I believe them to be very accurate. But when I looked at the graphs I saw that there was a possible anomaly.

  1. How does changing the concentration of hydrochloric acid affect its rate of reaction with ...

    The particles react fastest at the beginning of the experiment, which is why the graph is the steepest at the start. From this explanation, I can make a final prediction which is: ''the higher the concentration, the faster the rate of reaction''.

  2. Rate of reaction of hydrochloric acid and mangesium ribbon.

    Collect stop clock 5. Measure out 50 cm3 of 0.0M hydrochloric acid with the measuring cylinder 6. Pour hydrochloric acid into the conical flask 7. Collect thermometer 8. Measure the starting temperature of the hydrochloric acid 9. Measure 3cm of magnesium ribbon 10. Clean the surface of the magnesium with the sandpaper 11.

  1. Investigating the affect of concentration on the rate of reaction between magnesium and hydrochloric ...

    A simple curve is shown below. As you increase the temperature the particles will move faster as they will have more energy, however not all the particles in a substance will move at the same speed. As the temperature has been increased there will be more particles with an energy level equal to or greater than

  2. In the reaction between hydrochloric acid and magnesium, the hydrochloric acid will dissolve the ...

    This is a theory that is used to predict the rate of a reaction. The Collision Theory is based on the idea that for a chemical reaction to take place, it is necessary for the reacting particles to collide with each other with enough energy to break or form new

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work