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Rate Of Reaction Temperature

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Introduction

T An Investigation To Show How Changing The Temperature Of The Hydrochloric Acid Affects The Speed Of The Reaction Between The Marble Pieces And Hydrochloric Acid Variables In this experiment there are many variables which can be sorted into two groups-continuous and non-continuous. The variables are listed: -Size of conical flask (non-continuous) -Acid concentration-add water to the Hydrochloric Acid to lower the concentration (continuous) -Acid temperature- e.g. 30 C (continuous) -Type of acid- e.g. Hydrochloric Acid, Sulphuric Acid and Nitric Acid (non-continuous) -Size of Calcium Carbonate chips-surface area of Calcium Carbonate (continuous) -Mass of Calcium Carbonate (continuous) -Acid's volume- e.g. 30cm (continuous) -Form of Calcium Carbonate- powder or stones (non-continuous) The variable that I have decided to change in this experiment is the temperature of the Hydrochloric Acid. Quantitative Prediction In this experiment I predict that if I increase the temperature of the Hydrochloric Acid by 10 C, then the time taken for the reaction between the marble (Calcium Carbonate) pieces and the Hydrochloric Acid will approximately half. For example, if the original time taken is 60 seconds when the Hydrochloric Acid is measured at 20 C, then when the Hydrochloric Acid is at 30 C the time taken for the reaction will now be approximately 30 seconds. The reason for this theory is that as the temperature increases, particles will gain the minimal amount of activation energy needed for a collision. ...read more.

Middle

You will know this because it will be when the water in the measuring cylinder gets to the 50 cm mark. 13. Record your results when you have finished the experiment for one of the runs. 14. Clean the measuring cylinder used to measure out the Hydrochloric acid and dry properly with a clean towel. Also, wash the marble chips and dry them properly with a clean towel. Repeat for conical flask. 15. Repeat steps 4-13 for each of the experiments that you need to do. Results Here are the results of all of my experiments that I have done. It shows the average time taken as well as the three experiments I did for each temperature. Temperature of Acid ( C) 1st Test (s) 2nd Test (s) 3rd Test (s) Average (s) 19.5 55.88 76.33 84.09 72.10 32 34.58 41.25 47.56 41.13 40 25.73 25.47 29.77 26.99 50 22.14 25.12 20.33 22.53 60 17.36 16.13 16.43 16.64 Analysis The graph for the average of results is on another sheet of paper. From my results you can see that the higher the temperature, the faster the rate of reaction (time taken for the reaction between the Calcium Carbonate pieces and the Hydrochloric acid). The reason for the speed of the reaction to get quicker is due to the increase of successful collisions happening each second between molecules. ...read more.

Conclusion

Further to this, I predicted that if I increased the temperature of the Hydrochloric acid by more or less 10 C, then the time taken for the measuring cylinder to fill up with 50 cm of Carbon Dioxide would roughly half. There is not enough sufficient evidence to support my prediction as my prediction only came true for the first three experiments tested. I think that I would have to test with different temperatures to see if my prediction could be proved right and get a firm conclusion. Further work: The further work I could do which I am proposing is to do the same experiment but instead of using the temperature's 19.5 C and 32 C, I would use 20 C and 30 C to go along with 40 C, 50 C and 60 C. I would do this to get the difference between all the temperature's exactly the same which would make my results more accurate and far more easily to conclude from. I would also, instead of doing three experiments for each temperature, do five experiments to make my results more reliable, cutting out the chance that anomalous results would effect my overall average results. Hopefully, I would get more reliable and more consistent results this way, which would help try to prove my prediction reassuringly correct. I could also add on another two temperatures, 10 C and 70 C along with the other suggested above. This would give us a better range of results to work with to see if my prediction really was correct. ...read more.

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