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Rates of Reaction Investigation

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Introduction

Rates of Reaction Investigation Benjamin's coursework is a??under?law 2000 COURSEWORK Introduction Our investigation is about rates of reaction. A rate of reaction is the speed of a chemical reaction. There are certain things that could change this. Concentration When you have a concentrated solution there are more particles therefore more chances of collision. Solution 1 Solution 2 Solution 1 is a less concentrated solution. There are less particles to collide therefore less chance of collision. In solution 2 there are more particles and because particles move all the time there is more chance of a collision. Temperature When you have a high temperature the particles in a solution move faster (more chances of a collision) and with enough energy for a reaction to take place. Solution 1 Solution 2 Here both solutions have the same number of particles. In Solution 1, that is heated at a low temperature, the particles move slowly so there is less chance of a collision. In Solution 2, that is heated at a high temperature, the particles are moving faster therefore more chance of a collision. Surface area When you have a large surface area there are more places where a particle can collide therefore more chances of a reaction. Solution 1 Solution 2 On this diagram in Solution 1 there is less surface area so less surface for the particles to collide therefore less chance of a reaction. ...read more.

Middle

Temperature / K Time for ink cross to disappear /S 296 135 298 119 302 90 307 62 311 45 317 37 320 34 326 24 332 20 The above table shows the higher the temperature the faster the reaction. Method Sodium thiosulphate 1. First we put our goggles and aprons on and got our equipment ready. 2. Measure out 50 ml of sodium thiosulphate and 10 ml of hydrochloric acid in the measuring cylinders. Take the measurement from the meniscus, that's the dip in the top of the liquid. 3. Put the conical flask on the tile with the 'x' on it and pour the sodium thiosulphate in. 4. Start the timer when the hydrochloric acid touches the thiosulphate. 5. Continue timing until the 'x' disappears as a result of the solution turning milky repeat the process three times. Watch for anomalous results. Sodium thiosulphate and water solution 1. Measure out 40 ml of sodium thiosulphate and 10 ml of water in the measuring cylinders. Take the measurement from the meniscus. 2. Put the conical flask on the tile with the 'x' on it and pour the sodium thiosulphate and water into the flask. This makes the total solution in the conical flask, 50 ml. 3. Start the timer when the hydrochloric acid touches the thiosulphate and water solution 4. Continue timing until the 'x' disappears as a result of the solution turning milky repeat the process three times. Watch for anomalous results. ...read more.

Conclusion

This meant that a conclusion could be made. I think it went quite well but we did have our cross rubbed off once and had to draw it again. This meant the cross that we drew was not the same as the cross before. If it was a darker cross the second time we would have been able to see it for longer. This is a reason why we may have had anomalous results. Another reason could have been that the timing was not accurate. Bad eye sight or tired eyes could have played a part. The solutions may not have been measured up correctly. We also had an unknown liquid in a measuring cylinder when doing one of the experiments so it could have been contaminated. Besides the anomalous results, we still had sufficient evidence to support a firm conclusion. In an ideal world the experiment could have been done so much better because we would have had unlimited resources and time to do more repeats. We would have clean equipment every time when we came into the room to prevent contamination. We could have had a machine to check when the cross had gone. We could have reduced human error and increase accuracy by using Burettes to measure the liquids rather than measuring cylinders. Burettes measure to the nearest 0.05cm3. As extra work we could see if there is a limit to how fast the rate of reaction can go. ...read more.

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