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Rates of reaction throughout the year

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Corroding Statue I am trying to find out if a statue made of magnesium corrodes at different rates through out the year. Scientific Knowledge: Some scientific knowledge, like the collision theory and information and equations on the origin of acid rain, will help me in my investigation. Useful definitions: Activation energy: this is the minimum energy that two particles must posses for a reaction to occur when they collide. Catalyst: A catalyst speeds up a reaction by reducing the activation energy. Collision Theory: For a reaction to occur, the reactant particles must collide with each other and with enough energy (activation energy). How different conditions affect the rate of reaction: Temperature- Low temperature High temperature -Low temperature- few collisions, low rate of reaction. -High temperature- more collisions, high rate of reaction. . Concentration- Low concentration High concentration -Low concentration: particles far apart, few collisions, low rate of reaction. -High concentration: particles more crowed more collisions high rate of reaction Surface area- Low surface area ............ High surface area -Increase in surface area, increases the rate of reaction. -Smaller particles have a larger surface area than larger molecules. Catalyst- A catalyst is a substance which speeds up a reaction by lowering the activation energy but is chemically unchanged at the end of the reaction. ...read more.

Middle

I will repeat this 4 more times but I dilute the acid with more water every time. The second time there will be 40cm� of acid and 10cm� of water, the third time there will be 30cm� of acid and 20cm� of water, recording my results each time. I will continue this until there is 40cm� of water and 10cm� of acid in the beaker. I will insert my results into a table, and make graphs of my data. I will conduct the experiment a second time to get the most accurate results I can Safety Precautions: * I will wear an apron at all times. * I will wear goggles at all times. * Any acid spills that might happen, I will clean it up with a damp cloth. * Chairs and school bags will be tucked in under the table. Possible sources of error: 1. Magnesium strip not being placed flat on the surface of the acid. 2. Volumes incorrect. 3. Time not started correctly. Obtaining evidence: What I did: First, I measured out a 5cm strip of magnesium. Next I measured out 50cm3 of sulphuric acid, using a measuring cylinder, and poured the sulphuric acid into a beaker. Next I took a 5cm magnesium strip, making sure the strip was flat, and dropped it in the all acid solution. ...read more.

Conclusion

If I used the gas syringe my graph would look like this: Diagram of gas syringe: Improvements: If I did the experiment again the improvements I would make would be: * I would measure out the water and sulphuric acid to a greater degree of accuracy. * I would make sure the magnesium strip was completely flat when dropping it into the solution. * I would be more accurate on my timing. * I would repeat my experiment again to get more accurate results. Were my results accurate enough? : Yes, I think my results were accurate because the shapes of my graphs were what I predicted. The rate vs. concentration was proportional on my graph, and time vs. concentration was inversely proportional on my graph. Results that did not fit the pattern: In my experiment I got a few results that did not fit the predicted pattern. This may be because of a few things: * The beaker was not rinsed out properly, so that affected the concentration. * The magnesium was not cleaned properly. * There may have been temperature fluctuations. Are my results good enough to convince other people? : Yes, I think they are because the results fitted exactly with my predictions, they are straight forward and easy to read, the results and method were based on sound scientific knowledge, the results are reproducible and the there are valid reasons why the magnesium statue corroded. ?? ?? ?? ?? 1 Adam Brown 11L - Chemistry coursework ...read more.

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3 star(s)

3 Stars
This laboratory investigation into magnesium corrosion begins well with a well researched introduction. The main section of the report is too brief and does miss key elements essential to any good laboratory report including a labelled method diagram and step wise easy to follow instructions. More care also needs to be taken when evaluating the results simply stating that the results supported the prediction is insufficient, more links need to be made between the result and the science behind both corrosion and the reaction between a metal and an acid. Improvements have been suggested throughout the text.

Marked by teacher Cornelia Bruce 18/03/2013

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