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reaction time

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Conclusion As you can see from my graph the reaction time gets quicker and quicker until u reach the optimum temperature which was 60 C. The reaction time will then start to decrease and the enzyme will start to loose it original shape and denature. The heat gives the enzymes kinetic energy so that the enzymes can move around more and this will cause them to speed up the reaction and create more successful collisions. I will now explain what the lock and key theory is. The lock and key theory is basically the break down of more substrates and creates many more successful collisions but this does not happen all the way through the reaction as the enzyme starts to denature at 60 C. This may occur because the enzyme is a polypeptide which is a protein chain that is held by the hydrogen bonds and as the temperature increases the enzymes will pick up on the kinetic energy and this will make them move along faster and energetically and as they move faster and faster creating more successful collisions and as this will happen this is when the enzyme will not work properly and begin to denature. As you can see from the diagram above this is what an enzyme looks like when active and can work in this condition and temperature it can work in. As you can see from the diagram above this is an enzyme in which it is getting denatured and this is where the enzyme can no longer work and is also due to the temperature why the enzyme has turned out to be this way. ...read more.


When these particles are heated they gain more energy which makes the particles go faster and more successful collisions will take place and this will increase the rate of reaction and enable enzymes to work much faster in these conditions and break down the substrate. My first graph shows us that the enzyme is beginning to loose its original shape and is starting to denature at the temperature at 70 C and the temperature 0.0077 where as the temperature before this is 0.021. As we can see from my second graph we have spotted an anomalous result at the end of my reading which is very different from all the other results that I got. This could have been because of a number of reasons such as I may have added too much iodine to the mixture or that could have misread the amount of amylase that I put in the test tube or that I never washed out the test tubes before using them again. Also that stopping the stop watch too early or too late would have also affected my experiment and may have caused me to get this anomalous result. The activation energy is some of the energy which is required for a reaction to happen. A lot of these enzymes need a bit more energy for a reaction to take place and when they get this energy it is the activation energy. Enzymes are precise in the reactions that they catalyse and there reactions are very quick. ...read more.


Another way of improving my experiment is by using a colour meter. The colour meter would have enabled me to measure how much light is able to pass through the substance which would have given me accurate results and may have stopped my experiment at the right time. Also I could have used an electrical water bath which would have helped with my experiment and also fungal amylase which is from fungui. There was a systematic error that happened during my experiment which was that the temperature of the water. Whilst doing my experiment it was hard to get the temperature of the water exact. From looking at my graph and results they show us that enzymes do not work after certain temperatures and slow down, denature and no longer work. Also that some of the limitations that I could use as well if I were to do my experiment again is that firstly I could make my experiment more accurate by taking the measurements even lees. For example as we take the measurements every 10 C we could take it less than that like 5 C or 7 C so we can see if anything happened in between these temperatures. We could carry on the experiment longer to see what may have happened to the enzyme to about 90 C. I could use more affective resources to help me get more accurate and reliable results as I have explained above in improvements to my experiment. ...read more.

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