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Report on Newton's laws of motion

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

 | Page


 Newton’s Laws


Abstract

 Have ever been in a car when the driver has suddenly applied the brakes? Have you ever tried to pull a heavy trolley or observed a plane flying in the air? If so, then you have experienced Sir Isaac Newton’s Laws of Motion. Newton’s three laws of motion are applied in everyday experience of our normal activities —from how the planets move around the Sun to how a person walks. This report is intended to help understand the meanings of the three laws of motion. The paper is also trying to find the relationship between force and motion. Throughout the whole report we will apply these laws to everyday practices.

Table of Contents                                                                               Page number

Introduction……………………………………………………………………...3

Newton's First Law of Motion (Law of Inertia)…………………………4

Examples of the Newton’s first law of motion…………………………..4

Newton’s second law of motion…………………………………………5

Some Applications of Newton’s second law…………………………….5

Newton’s Third Law of motion………………………………………….6

Some examples of the third law…………………………………………7

Conclusions……………………………………………………………..8

References………………………………………………………………9

Introduction

Sir Isaac Newton was in my mind the father of physics. His many discoveries in the field of physics prove that. He was born in 1642 and died in 1727. He had his bachelor degree and his masters of arts by 1669. Newton’s main fields were science and mathematics. He created the well-known famous calculus before Leibniz' became popular. On the other hand, Newton's most affective and famous discovery was gravity which states that {the earth's (gravitational pull) pulls objects toward it}.

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Middle

Newton's First Law of Motion (Law of Inertia):

Newton's first law of motion states: an object at rest remains at rest and an object in motion continues in motion with a constant velocity (that is, with a constant speed in a straight line) (Serway, 2004).

This means that there is a natural trend of objects to resist any change in their state of motion and continue doing what they are originally doing. This is why the first law of motion is also called the law of inertia (NASA, n.d.)

If all the external forces cancel each other out, then the object will maintain the same state of motion (constant velocity). Now, if the velocity is zero, then the object remains at rest. Thus, if an additional external force is applied, then the velocity will change. However, how to determine the amount of change in velocity will be determined later using Newton’s second law of motion (Serway, 2004).

Now assume that someone parks a car on a flat road and forgets to put the vehicle into park. The car should stay in that spot. This state is called inertia.  Imagine that All of a sudden some kid crashes into the car with a bike. These kids represent an unbalanced force.  Because of this crash the car should start to move and might accelerate to 3km/h.

The result of friction between the road and tires will lead to eventual stop of the car.

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Conclusion

Once all current forces are balanced, then the behavior of bodies can be expected using Newton’s first law. On the other hand, Newton’s second law explains the behavior of objects in case of unbalanced forces.

 According to Newton’s third law, (action and reaction forces) act on different bodies. Thus when we apply a certain force on an object, we will directly receive the same amount of reaction on the other object that causes the action.

You can observe one of the most important applications of the three laws of motion in a space flight. The third law provides force to move a rocket, while the second law is used to convert that force into acceleration. The first law, then, keeps a space craft for instant in orbit.


References:

  1. Hewitt, P. (2010). Conceptual Physics (11th edition ed., Vol., pp.). Pearson.
  2. Newton's First Law. Retrieved 12, 2012, from (http://www.grc.nasa.gov/WWW/k-12/airplane/newton1g.html
  1. Newton's Laws of Motion. Retrieved 12, 2012, from http://www.bookrags.com/research/newtons-laws-of-motion-wom/
  1. “Physics for scientists and engineers“;by Serway and Jewett, 6th edition, Thomson    Brooks/Cole © 2004.
  1. The Physics of Everyday Phenomena: A Conceptual Introduction to Physics”; by W. Thomas Griffith, 3rd edition, Pearson 2007.
  1. Third Laws of Motion. Teachertech. Retrieved 12, 2012, from http://teachertech.rice.edu/Participants/louviere/Newton/law3.html
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