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science case study

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Introduction

Contents page 1 introduction 2 scientific theory 3 for mmr vaccines 4 against mmr vaccines 5 conclusions 6 Bibliography Introduction My case study is about how safe are mmr vaccinations and the reason's for and against the use of compulsory vaccinations. The way my case study is structured is the introduction firstly and the scientific theory ( the science behind mmr vaccination) thirdly the reasons for mmr vaccinations also the reasons against mmr vaccinations I will also include my opinion in the conclusion and finally a bibliography Scientific theory The MMR vaccine is an injection that prevents you from catching the following diseases. In the UK it is given to children at 12 to 15 months old, with a reinforcing dose (a booster) before school, usually between 3 and 5 years. * Measles - this can cause ear infections, pneumonia, fits and encephalitis (inflammation of the brain). Sometimes it can be fatal. * Mumps - this can cause meningitis, which can result in deafness. ...read more.

Middle

It is suggested that people in long term institutional care, which are not immune, should have the vaccine. It is also recommended that students starting at college or university, who have not received the vaccine previously, should be offered it. For mmr vaccinations There are many reasons as to why there should be mmr vaccinations such as Today; the incidence of measles has fallen to less than 1% of people under the age of 30 in countries with routine childhood vaccination. The benefit of vaccination against measles in preventing illness, disability, and death has been well-documented. The first 20 years of licensed measles vaccination in the U.S. prevented an estimated 52 million cases of the disease, 17,400 cases of mental retardation, and 5,200 deaths. During 1999-2004, a strategy led by the World Health Organization and UNICEF led to improvements in measles vaccination coverage that averted an estimated 1.4 million measles deaths worldwide. Underneath is a graph that show how vaccinations have fell in the United States Evidence 1 this show the drop of measles in the United States because of the mmr ...read more.

Conclusion

* Temporary low platelet count, which can cause a bleeding disorder (about 1 out of 30,000 doses) Severe Problems (Very Rare) * Serious allergic reaction (less than 1 out of a million doses) * Several other severe problems have been known to occur after a child gets MMR vaccine. But this happens so rarely, experts cannot be sure whether they are caused by the vaccine or not. These include: o Deafness o Long-term seizures, coma, or lowered consciousness o Permanent brain damage Also there is weak evidence that autism within people has risen to vaccinations Evidence 4 Conclusion I think that mmr vaccinations are safe because the benefits outweigh the risks (there is a 90-95%) chance that once you are injected with a vaccine you will rarely get mumps, measles, rubella also it is extremely rare to get a rash after the vaccine it occurs ( 1 in 100,000) people get it also there isn't much scientific evidence that mmr vaccinations lead to autism and having a fever or rash is better than having measles, mumps and rubella because the effects of the three diseases are more dangerous than having a fever or rash for a day or two. ...read more.

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Here's what a teacher thought of this essay

4 star(s)

This is a well written and structured report.
1. The use of statistics to back up claims is good.
2. The description of how a vaccine works needs to be finished.
3. The conclusion needs to be rewritten.
****

Marked by teacher Luke Smithen 23/07/2013

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