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See how the pH and the temperature levels change during an acid/base titration using the indicator and thermometer method.

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Introduction

GCSE Chemistry Coursework on a Titration Aim To see how the pH and the temperature levels change during an acid/base titration using the indicator and thermometer method. Results Tables Analysis of Results From my graphs that I have drawn on the previous four pages, I can conclude that adding any amount of acid to a solution of alkali will result in a change of pH value, colour and temperature. This is very clear, despite the fact that I managed to achieve some anomalous results during my experiment. This error only occurred during the 2 Molar solution experiment where the temperature and colour was recorded and not in the 0.5 Molar solution where the pH value and colour was recorded. For the 0.5 Molar solution, as the amount of acid added to the alkali increases the pH value of the solution decreases at quite a steady rate until it reaches pH 7 (neutralisation) and then the pH value decreases very quickly. Between 24cm3 and 27cm3 of acid added to the alkali the pH value dropped from pH 8 and pH 9 respectively to pH 1. ...read more.

Middle

The graph of the acid added against amount of temperature shows a positive correlation up to 27cm3 of acid added and then also shows the signs of a negative correlation between 28cm3 and 30cm3 of acid added. I have found that for the thermometer method, the temperature was inversely proportional to the amount of acid that was added to the alkali. Also, before the neutral point, the temperature started to increase quickly and then slowed down as it got closer to the neutral point. This may have happened because at the start of the experiment there was less liquid in the beaker for the reaction to heat. As acid was added, this meant that there was more liquid for the reaction to heat, and so the rate of temperature increase would have started to slow down as you got closer to the neutral point, where the temperature started decreasing. Another reason for the slow increase in temperature was that the acid was cooler than the alkali when it was added. ...read more.

Conclusion

be poured into it * An alternative piece of equipment than a burette should be used to make sure that the correct amount of acid is poured into the beaker containing alkali. I suggest using a 2ml syringe to slowly pour the acid in as the results will be more accurate * You could also keep adding more and more acid to the alkali and see how the temperature of the solution is affected and draw a graph to show your findings * The main problem that was affecting the results of the thermometer method was that the room temperature was changing and never remained at a constant temperature. There was no way of controlling the temperature in this experiment unless it was done in a laboratory under controlled conditions If I had had enough time, I would have repeated my experiment for each molar solution two times and take an average of the results so that I can get a more accurate result. I would have also taken more readings closer to the point of neutralisation to make sure that I got a more accurate result. Khushpal Grewal 11K ...read more.

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