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Should food additives be banned

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Should food additives be banned? Contents: s Introduction Page 1 Why use additives? Page 2 Benefits and risks of food additives Page3 E-numbers and why are they used? Page 4 Different types of food additives Page 5 The two main food colourings? Page 6 Health risks of food colourings Page 6 Case Study; No more blue smarties! Page 7 For and against for food additives Page 7 Hyperactivity in children Page 8 Conclusion Page 9 Bibliography Page 9 Why use additives? People use additives in food to make the food look more attractive and colourful also to make customers' buy the food. Additives are used so the foods have a high quality. Many people enjoy making cakes, breads and ice-creams at home, however most of today's food is bought from shops and supermarkets. In some products, they are so essential that additives are used even in certain organic foods. Many foods can be made at home without the addition of gelling agents.Thickners or stabilizers. Food cooked often produced in small quantities. "A Food additives and food ingredients are an essential part of many of the food products we take for granted. Preservatives prevent them from deteriorating too rapidly. ...read more.

Middle

E100 series Sweets, chocolates Antioxidants A chemical added to food to stop it going bad by reaction with oxygen in the air. E300 series Drinks such as lemonade Emulsifiers Helps to mix ingredients such as oil and water. E400+series Bread Sweeteners Replaces sugar in products, diet drinks and yoghurt. E400+series Tea Stabilizers Stabilizers help to stop these ingredients from separating. E400+series Strawberries Preservatives They add substances to food in order to inhibit the growth of bacteria, yeasts, moulds and other micro-organisms. E200 Sugar, vinegar The two main food colourings There are two major types of food colouring, ones extracted naturally or ones created synthetically. Natural food dyes are much more varied and abundant and include: Natural food dyes are much more varied and abundant and include: * Caramel colouring, made from caramelized sugar, used in cola products and also in cosmetics. * Annatto, a reddish-orange dye made from the seed of the Achiote. * A green dye made from the chlorophyll of chlorella algae * Cochineal, a red dye derived from the cochineal insect, Dactylopius coccus. * Betanin, a deep reddish colour extracted from beets. I got this information from http://naturalmedicine.suite101.com/article.cfm/food_coloring_makes_adhd_children_hyperactiveThis is reliable because I have got the same information on different websites. ...read more.

Conclusion

Many children with ADHD aren't hyperactive and those who are may not be hyperactive in the doctor's office. Information about your child's behaviour needs to be collected from different people who know your child including your child's teachers or anyone else who is familiar with your child's behaviour. Food additives make young children hyper-active these are the behaviours that happened. I got this information from http://www.food.gov.uk/safereating/chemsafe/additivesbranch/colours/hyper/ this is a reliable website because it is checked by the government. Hyperactivity is a general term of describing behaviour difficulties these are the different difficulties: Memory Movement Language Emotional respond Learning Conclusion Overall, I personally think that food additives should not be banned as there are a lot of benefits such as; it persuades customers to buy food which looks more attractive. On the other hand, there are risks to food additives as I have mentioned before and have used many sources to back it up; food additives can make children become hyperactive, also can give allergies. However, people may think I am wrong as they may have different viewpoints about this topic. In my viewpoint I would banned the sweeteners because they make children hyper-active and they have a bad effect for your body. The sources that I used have benefits for food additives and against food additives the benefits are to attract more people to buy food, risks are you can get allergies. ...read more.

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Here's what a star student thought of this essay

3 star(s)

Response to the question

The student has answered the question, going into depth about different areas regarding food additives. They have given in depth information on these areas, touching on things such as E-numbers, and classifying each type. This is great because the student ...

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Response to the question

The student has answered the question, going into depth about different areas regarding food additives. They have given in depth information on these areas, touching on things such as E-numbers, and classifying each type. This is great because the student has then covered all bases and is then bound to achieve high marks.

Level of analysis

The writer has analysed well, to the extent of specifying certain foods and colours that we should not eat. They have made it clear that food additives should be banned throughout the courseworl, giving many disadvantages, but their overall conclusion is that food additives should not be banned. As a GCSE student, their argument should be more stable and grounded, and they should reach a more valid conclusion giving appropriate reasons.

Quality of writing

Given the coursework was fairly satisfactory, the quality of writing was poor at times, with some sentences not making sense at all. It is clear that a proof reading is needed, as there are many errors. There is nothing wrong with decorating a coursework, but the level of decoration for a GCSE piece on this is inadequate and automatically gives it a feel of a lower grade. The student has sourced their information, and also attempted to justify why their information is correct. However, they have used the reason ‘government checked’ repetitively, which makes no sense at times, in one case Wikipedia is not a reliable website, but is stated as one.


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