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Should we be cloning?

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Should we be cloning? By Stephanie Saunders Contents Page. Page 3........................................................The issues of cloning Page 4......................................................The science of cloning ...............................................................Natural cloning .............................................................Artificial cloning Page 5.................................... Artificial cloning: ways we can clone Page 6....................................................How was Dolly cloned? Page 7.........................................Therapeutic cloning and stem cells Page 8........................................Who would benefit from cloning? Page 9..........................Who would benefit from cloning? (continued) Page 10............................................The laws surrounding cloning Page 11...................................Should we or shouldn't we be cloning Page 12............................................How reliable are my sources? .......................................Who would be affected by cloning? .................................................Are there any alternatives? ..............................................Must any laws be considered? ........................................Conclusion: should we be cloning? The issues of cloning. Cloning: The production of descendants asexually from a single animal or plant. The clone is of the same genetic constitution and results naturally or otherwise, e.g. by plant grafting, cutting etc. (As defined by Webster's Dictionary of the English language) Simple organisms, such as bacterium cells and the Hydra have always used asexual reproduction, and so the offspring are clones of the parent organism. Humans have been grafting and cutting plants for hundreds of years so that they can have a plant that matches their requirements, yet nobody protested against this. It is only recently, as scientists have learned to clone larger, more complex animals that people have been asking the question: Should we be cloning? Ten years ago, in 1997, scientists managed to successfully clone a mammal. The clone, Dolly became a media sensation, and people around the world knew about her creation. ...read more.

Middle

for many generations. N/A N/A Plants -Grafting Gardeners Farmers They can continue to have a good flowering plant etc. for many generations They can continue to have crops that produce good fruit etc. for many generations. N/A N/A Animals -Embryo Transplants Farmers Those suffering from famine. They can produce many animals for their farm. They can also choose the properties that they want through the parents. This would make money for them Animals could be produced on a large scale, more food. Other farmers The embryos that don't survive They wouldn't be able to compete with a farmer who is using this technology by using traditional methods. Their life would be lost. Type of cloning Who will benefit? Why? Who will be harmed? Why? Animals -Fusion Cell Cloning Farmers They can produce many animals for their farm. They can also choose the properties that they want through the parents. This would make money for them. Other farmers The embryos that don't survive They wouldn't be able to compete with a farmer who is using this technology by using traditional methods. Their life would be lost. For every 100 experiments carried out, only around 1 or 2 survive. Also, about 30% of those born alive are born with debilitating disease such as "large offspring syndrome" Animals -Therapeutic Cloning Millions of patients with diseases. New cells could be produced for them without any rejection issues. This could greatly increase their quality of life and even save their life. ...read more.

Conclusion

All of my diagrams are factual and do not conflict with each other or my references. However, figure D is from an American site, and so the laws listed may be American. However, it illustrates the fact that there are many laws involved in cloning, and so I chose to include it. Who will be affected by cloning? See Table II for information on who will be affected. The main people who will affected by cloning are: -Patients -The embryos Are there any alternatives? Yes, there are alternatives to cloning. For therapeutic cloning, donor organs however there are rejection issues with this, and farmers using cloning, they already use selective breeding to get the best crops/livestock, and so can continue to use it. Must any laws be considered? Yes, there are many laws surrounding cloning (see figure D for a rough guide) and these help prevent people from mistreating the technology. Laws vary from country to country, but there are also a few international laws on cloning. Conclusion: should we be cloning? I feel that we do not know enough about cloning to be using it regularly, however, in order to gain more knowledge on cloning, we have to experiment, and so I think that as long as we do not experiment on humans, then it is forgivable although animal rights campaigners may not agree with me. Whilst I think that therapeutic cloning is a great idea, I think that scientists need to learn more about it before they begin to use it on humans. Overall, I think that we should be cloning, but not on humans and not too much before we know more about it. ...read more.

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