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Should we use Nuclear power in the UK

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Jaman khan

Should we use Nuclear power in the UK?

The main sources of energy that we use in the world today are fossil fuels; these are hydrocarbons found on the earths crust. However these sources are running out, they’re non renewable resources and raise environmental concerns. A global movement towards the generation of renewable energy is therefore under way to help meet increased energy demands(please refer to figure 7). Nuclear power is a form of extracting energy from materials such as plutonium and uranium. Creating energy from these materials can provide future electricity for the world today. Nuclear power is a long-term sustainable energy for the demand of energy now.

How Nuclear Power works?

image04.png

(Reference:http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/shared/spl/hi/guides/456900/456932/html/nn2page1.stm  Last updated: 20/2/09)

Nuclear power stations work in pretty much the same way as fossil fuel-burning stations, except that a "chain reaction" inside a nuclear reactor makes the heat instead. The reactor uses Uranium rods as fuel, and the heat is generated by nuclear fission into the nucleus of the uranium atoms, which split roughly in half and release energy in the form of heat. Water is pumped through the reactor to take the heat away, this then heats water to make steam. The steam drives turbines which drive generators producing the energy. (Updated: Nov 20, 2008,http://www.darvill.clara.net/altenerg/nuclear.htm).

Diagram: What happens to a Uranium atom in Nuclear Fission?

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(Last updated: 5, Feb, 2009 Title: Nuclear Chemistry www.zamandayolculuk.

...read more.

Middle

http://www.iht.com/articles/2008/02/19/business/greenbox20.php.).And unlike fossil fuels when unearthing the energy source uranium it would not take vast amounts of lands.

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Disadvantages

Many People point to the health risk and dangers of using Nuclear power as well as the capabilities it has of nuclear weapons. The amount of nuclear waste produced is very high. And when disposing of the waste material it could be a problem. Another problem is where the Nuclear power station is located, it can affect many people around it for example, ‘With regard to dangers, an overheating reactor could be catastrophic, as seen in Chernobyl, and before that at Three Mile Island, in the U.S.A where some people claim it has caused heightened risks of Cancer in areas downwind from the island. It must be noted that no such accident has ever occurred in the U.K. or in France, where virtually all of their energy comes from Nuclear reactors.’ (Title: Is nuclear power the way forward, Date visited: 3rd July 2008,http://www.sustainablestuff.co.uk/nuclear-power-the-way-forward.html ) Greenpeace and the friends of the earth are among those who are unhappy with the government’s arguments for more nuclear power (http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/uk_politics/6982884.stm last Updated: 2/2/09).

Disposing nuclear waste is a huge problem; there is a worry about how to discard of the high toxic waste, however this new source of energy does produce less waste than fossil fuels.

...read more.

Conclusion

Bibliography

http://www.sustainablestuff.co.uk/nuclear-power-the-way-forward.html

http://www.darvill.clara.net/altenerg/fossil.htm

http://www.greenpeace.org.uk/nuclear

http://www.marathonresources.com.au/uraniumindustry.asp

www.users.globalnet.co.uk/~rxv/orgmgt/casenuke.htm

www.darvill.clara.net/alterneg/nuclear.htm

http://www.marathonresources.com.au/uraniumindustry.asp

www.greenpeace.org.uk/tags/nuclear-power

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/uk_politics/6982884.stm

http://www.sustainablestuff.co.uk/nuclear-power-the-way-forward.html

http://www.iht.com/articles/2008/02/19/business/greenbox20.php

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/uk/7774452.stm

http://www.darvill.clara.net/altenerg/fossil.htm

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nuclear_power

http://www.marathonresources.com.au/uraniumindustry.asp

http://www.darvill.clara.net/altenerg/nuclear.htm

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/shared/spl/hi/guides/456900/456932/html/nn2page1.stm

http://www.zamandayolculuk.com/cetinbal/nuclearchemistry.htm

http://timeforchange.org/prediction-of-energy-consumption

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Note: These are contents that are generally on these pages.

  1. Introduction & how does Nuclear power works?  
  1. Nuclear fission, uranium and Radiation
  1. Advantages
  1. Disadvantages
  1. Overall Verdict
  1. Conclusion & Bibliography      

...read more.

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