• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

Stopping Distances

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Stopping distances

Aim

        The aim of this experiment is to investigate the things that will affect the stopping distance of a toy car. I am investigating how the stopping distance of a car is related to the speed that it is going and how much force is used to stop a car going at a certain speed and for a certain distance.

Variables

● The landing surface (This would increase the rolling friction on the wheels of the car therefore slowing it down.

● Environment (If the air was warmer then the car would move slower because the air has more energy causing the car to slow down.)

● The gradient of the slope (changing the height of the ramp giving more energy to the car so it speeds up)

● The weight of the vehicle (The mass will be greater so the car will gain more weight as gravity will be acting upon it.)

● The size and the shape of the car (This would effect the aerodynamic. The smaller the car, the more streamlined it is and the less drag it will have and the bigger the car the more drag it will have and the slower it will go down the slope and the shorter the stopping distance is.)

...read more.

Middle

Apparatus

 1 Toy car (steel)

 1 Metre guttering pipe (half pipe)

 1 Metre ruler (X3)

 Clamp

 Clamp stand

Method

  1. Make sure to take safety precautions at all times when carrying out any experiment making sure that you have checked through the area making sure that there is no danger.
  2. Set out the apparatus shown on the diagram below using correct measurements(height of the clamp from the floor is 40cm)
  3. Place the car at 0cm up the ramp and let the car go (align the car from the back of the car to the line on the pipe.)
  4. keep doing this by setting the car up the ramp every 10cm (do this and repeat it 3 times to get some accurate results)
  5. This experiment involves three major factors, gravitational potential energy, kinetic energy and friction.
  6. During the course of this investigation I will aim to find how one specific factor effects the stopping distance of a toy car down a ramp. The factors which effect stopping distance are; Tires, Brakes, Road surface, Speed of car, the Aerodynamics etc. The toy car will model a real car with frictional forces between the bench top and the wheels acting as brakes. I will choose to investigate the effect of speed because it is the most easily varied.
...read more.

Conclusion

ss="c8">47.0

42.3

20.0

83.0

84.0

84.0

83.7

30.0

135.0

127.0

123.0

128.3

40.0

179.0

174.0

165.0

172.7

50.0

227.0

209.0

216.0

217.3

60.0

261.0

256.0

230.0

249.0

70.0

319.0

298.0

306.0

307.7

80.0

346.0

348.0

339.0

344.3

Results



image00.png


Diagram

Conclusion

        My graph tells me that the further the car up the ramp the longer the stopping distance and the shorter the car up the ramp the shorter the stopping distance.

        I can also see the graph has a positive correlation which is very strong as most of the points fit to the line of best fit.  

The equation for kinetic energy is KE = ½ mv2. This means that the car will be able to accelerate for longer, making the velocity higher and the stopping distance greater. I predict that if I increase the height of the ramp, the further the stopping distance would be. I feel that this is because the higher the ramp, the more G.P.E.

...read more.

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE Forces and Motion section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE Forces and Motion essays

  1. Marked by a teacher

    Stopping distances of toy cars travelling down a ramp

    3 star(s)

    106 Bench too short / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / I discovered that the

  2. Investigation is to see how changing the height of a ramp affects the stopping ...

    I am doing a graph of stopping distance vs. speed2 because the formula 1/2MV2 = FxD, uses v2. This means that v2 is directly proportional to the distance, which is more useful than just the speed. Therefore I do predict that the stopping distance is proportional to speed2, thus the graph should be a curve and also because there

  1. Factors Affecting the Speed of a Car after Freewheeling down a Slope

    This was decided because it would provide me with a larger number of readings, easy to replicate and easy to set up without being affected by factors that I feel would affect the other two variables. A large number of readings will reduce the errors to the minimum and allow me to get a more accurate analysis of my results.

  2. The experiment consisted of recording the results of a small toy car being allowed ...

    this, and we must seriously consider these errors during calculation and observation of the graphs. These bars have been placed on all the graphs, even though on the first two graphs they are barely visible. To counter the problem of error bounds, we could reduce the number of decimal places

  1. Investigation into factors affecting the speed of a car rolling down a ramp

    He dropped a heavy stone and a light stone simultaneously and they both accelerated at the same rate and landed at the same time. However, the car will have friction acting on it - between the wheels of the car and the ramp.

  2. My aim is to set-up and carry out an experiment to investigate the stopping ...

    This was very hard to keep constant because the angle of the car looked straight enough to the eye but was probably out. Also to ensure accuracy we had to make sure we looked down as close to a 90-degree angle as possible when measuring stopping distances off the ruler, this might of caused error in the results.

  1. In this experiment I aim to find out how the force and mass affect ...

    that makes up P.E: P.E = mgh P.E = mass x gravity x height So the higher an object goes, the more gravitational potential energy it gains. When it falls, it's potential energy is converted into kinetic energy and; since energy can neither be created or destroyed, only converted; it will move at a faster speed.

  2. Approximate Stopping Distances

    Braking distance is not directly proportional to speed whereas the thinking distance is. E.g. when the speed of the vehicle is 30 mph the braking distance is 45 ft whereas when the speed of the vehicle is 60 mph the braking distance massively increases to 180 ft which shows that the rate of change is not consistent.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work