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Strength of a string practical investigation

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Strength of a string practical investigation

        This coursework assignment requires me to collect, analyse and evaluate data about the strength of manila string. It entails investigating the young’s modulus of the string and other methods to complete my investigation.

Aims:

  1. To collect data on the strength of manila string by conducting a practical experiment.
  2. To calculate figures of young’s modulus for the manila string and draw stress and strain graphs from the data calculations
  3. To discuss the physics involved

Plan:

        In this investigation I will collect results on the extension of manila string when certain forces are applied to it, for which I will analyse and calculate the young’s modulus. The results I will collect are for twisted manila string, I will collect three sets of results for one strand, two strands and three strands of manila string. The data will be averaged to give more accurate results and these averaged results will be used to create graphs, calculate young’s modulus of string and I will analyse the graphs to complete my investigation.

        I will be drawing force and extension graphs from the averaged data. I will also calculate the stress and strain values and plot this on a graph. I will analyse both graphs and if any patterns exist I will analyse them to make judgements and conclusions.

        I will use Microsoft excel spreadsheet program to make the data tables, using the data I have collected. Formulas will be used to calculate average extension, stress, strain and young’s modulus from the data collected. All the results and numerical values will be set to two significant figures of accuracy.

        I have included a diagram of the set-up (figure 1) below which was used to obtain the results.

image01.png

Figure 1 (Source: AS Physics CD-ROM)

...read more.

Middle

14.7

2

19.6

2.5

24.5

3

29.4

3.5

34.3

4

39.2

4.5

44.1

5

49

5.5

53.9

6

58.8

6.5

63.7

7

68.6

7.5

73.5

8

78.4

8.5

83.3

9

88.2

9.5

93.1

10

98

Table 3

Single strand

Extension (m)

Load (kg)

Test 1

Test 2

Test 3

Average extension (m)

Force (F=ma)

Stress (F/A)

Strain (E/L)

0.5

0.001

0

0.001

6.67E-04

4.9

1.73E+07

1.03E-03

1

0.002

0.001

0.002

1.67E-03

9.8

3.46E+07

2.56E-03

1.5

0.003

0.002

0.003

2.67E-03

14.7

5.19E+07

4.10E-03

2

BREAK

0.003

BREAK

1.00E-03

19.6

6.93E+07

1.54E-03

2.5

BREAK

Table 4

Double strand

Extension

Load (kg)

Test 1

Test 2

Test 3

Average extension (m)

Force (F=ma)

Stress (F/A)

Strain (E/L)

0.5

0

0

0

0.00E+00

4.9

4.34E+06

0.00E+00

1

0.001

0.001

0.001

1.00E-03

9.8

8.67E+06

1.54E-03

1.5

0.002

0.001

0.001

1.33E-03

14.7

1.30E+07

2.05E-03

2

0.002

0.002

0.002

2.00E-03

19.6

1.73E+07

3.08E-03

2.5

0.003

0.002

0.002

2.33E-03

24.5

2.17E+07

3.59E-03

3

0.003

0.002

0.003

2.67E-03

29.4

2.60E+07

4.10E-03

3.5

0.003

0.003

0.003

3.00E-03

34.3

3.04E+07

4.62E-03

4

0.004

0.004

0.003

3.67E-03

39.2

3.47E+07

5.64E-03

4.5

0.004

0.004

0.004

4.00E-03

44.1

3.90E+07

6.15E-03

5

BREAK

BREAK

BREAK

Table 5

Triple strand

Extension (m)

Load (kg)

Test 1

Test 2

Test 3

Average extension (m)

Force (F=ma)

Stress (F/A)

Strain (E/L)

0.5

0.001

0.001

0.001

1.00E-03

4.9

1.93E+06

1.54E-03

1

0.001

0.001

0.001

1.00E-03

9.8

3.86E+06

1.54E-03

1.5

0.001

0.001

0.001

1.00E-03

14.7

5.

...read more.

Conclusion

Resources and bibliography

The resources I used were:

  • Digital camera: To create evidence that I carried out my experiment and to better explain how I conducted my experiment.
  • Computer: this was used to put my results on and formulas were created to create averages, stress, strains and Young’s modulus calculations.
  • Computer graphs: I used excel to produce graphs with error markings, as the error markings were shown clearly when using excel when compared to hand drawn error bars, and thus resulted in better analysis.
  • AS physics text book: very useful, chapter 4-5 are very useful and contained lots of information on the physics theory of my investigation (9/10)
  • AS-physics CD-ROM: provided guides on how to set out coursework and information on the experiment hat this coursework was based on. (8/10)
  • AS Physics teacher: Miss Bottomly: Very helpful. Introduced coursework, hence this would not have been possible without teachers help. (10/10)
  • http://www.instron.com/applications/test_types/tension/index.asp: very good website, good introduction to what tensile testing is. (8/10)
  • http://www.tensiletest.com/: poor website for information, do not reply to emails and have little educational information about tensile testing, only selling services (1/10)
  • Collins instant revision, AS physics. Published 2002. Martin Gregory. Good diagrams and graphs, basic relevant information. (4/10)

Log Book

Date

Activity

16/6/04

Received briefing about the coursework and chose title. Began researching.

21/6/04

Researched about tensile testing, looked in revision books and textbooks.

23/6/04

Conducted preliminary experiment. Also began write up.

24/6/04

Continued write up, up to end of preliminary results. Made changes to methods for real experiment.

25/6/04 – 29/6/04

Continued with write up

30/6/04

Took main results.

1/7/04

Analysed main results, made observations and input data onto a spreadsheet program.

3/7/04

Graphed results and started analysis and conclusion

4/7/04 – 8/7/04

Completed analysis and conclusion. Also finished evaluation. Completed bibliography and summary. Read through coursework.

10/7/04

Rechecked and completed coursework.

...read more.

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