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Testing the bouncing efficiency of thre different balls.

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Introduction

Title: Efficiency lab Purpose: Find the efficiency of three different spheres Variables: Manipulated Variable: the type of ball used Responding Variable: height of the first bounce of the ball when it is dropped from 2m Controlled Variables: the force applied on the ball, the height at which the ball is dropped, flat surface Hypothesis: the efficiency of a sphere is going to depend largely on its mass and size, the less the mass and size, the higher that it will bounce, because the lesser the mass, the lesser amount of energy will be needed to push it up against the downward pull of gravity, and the smaller the size, the lesser friction air will create when it is bouncing up. ...read more.

Middle

Drop one of the three spheres selected from 2m off the ground or the very top of the meter sticks 5. Watch and then record the height of the sphere's first bounce 6. repeat step 4-5 for the other two spheres Observation: Type of ball used Mass of the ball(Kg) Height of first bounce, trial 1 (m) Height of first bounce, trial 2 (m) Height of first bounce, trial 3 (m) Average height of first bounce (m) Golf Ball 0.039 1.45 1.50 1.47 1.47 0.046 1.44 1.37 1.42 1.41 0.045 1.46 1.49 1.50 1.48 Tennis Ball 0.058 1.00 1.10 1.20 1.10 0.058 1.08 1.10 1.15 1.11 0.057 1.05 1.00 1.00 1.02 Field Hockey Ball 0.15 0.56 0.57 0.59 0.57 0.18 0.56 0.59 0.63 0.59 0.15 0.45 0.43 ...read more.

Conclusion

The amount of elastic energy of each ball was not considered in the experiment, and should be included. To find out how much the elastic energy of a sphere affects its efficiency, one has to find out the relationship between the elastic energy, the mass and the height of the ball and calculate to see how much difference this will make, and how important the elastic energy of a sphere is. An important error is that the height of each ball's bounce may not be entirely accurate since the ability of the human eyes is limited and can't tell exactly how many metres the ball bounced. To minimize the effect of this error, several trials and the results of many people can be combined, and then the average amongst the results can be calculated. ...read more.

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