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The aim is to investigate if there is a link between the number of carbon atoms in a fuel and the amount of heat produced by that fuel.

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Introduction

Chemistry - Coursework Aim The aim is to investigate if there is a link between the number of carbon atoms in a fuel and the amount of heat produced by that fuel. Prediction I predict that the more carbon atoms that are in a fuel, the more heat the fuel will generate. Risk Assessment There are some safety precautions that will have to be taken when the experiment is carried out. These will be determined by the hazards that are in the room and hazards that could occur. These are: * Heatproof mat * Goggles * Tie tucked in shirt * Hair clipped back * The alcohol's are flammable so care must be taken with them * Equipment might get hot * There will be naked flames Equipment used and reasons � Calorimeter - this is used to hold water. ...read more.

Middle

Then the mass of the first alcohol was weighed and the mass was recorded. The fuel was place underneath the calorimeter and the foil was wrapped around the tripod. A splint was lit and the fuel was alight. The door of the oven (the foil around the tripod) was closed immediately. The water is heated so that there is a rise in temperature rise of 20oC. As soon as the water has risen 20oC the flame is immediately extinguished and the temperature is monitored and the final temperature is recorded. The mass of the fuel is then recorded. This is done for 5 fuels, 3 times each. The water is replaced after each experiment so that it does not get too hot and it stays at the same volume, to ensure no water is lost due to evaporation. Preliminary work I have already learnt about products of combustion and the burning of fuels. Range of results fuel No. C Vol. ...read more.

Conclusion

No. moles Av. Temp (oC) Heat given off (KJ) H (KJ per mole) ethanol 0.633 0.137 21.3 8.55 653.28 propanol 0.756 0.126 30 12.9 1000 butanol 0.676 0.0091 28 11.76 1292.3 pentanol 0.76 0.0086 27.6 11.6 1348.9 hexanol 0.68 0.0086 27.6 11.6 1757.6 Calculations Example: Propanol Average mass used: 0.74+0.60+0.92 = 0.756 3 RMM (Relative Molecular mass): C=12 H=1 O=16 12 x 2 + 1 x 7 +16+ 1= 60 Number of moles = average mass used = 0.756 = 0.0126 RMM 60 Average increase in temperature: 24+23+43 = 90 = 30(degrees) 3 3 Conclusion From the graph I can see that the more carbon atoms a fuel have the more heat it gives off. I can see this because there is a strong positive correlation showing that the increase in carbon atoms gives an increase in temperature. This has proved my hypothesis correct. If I was to do this experiment again I would try and stick to the 20oC temperature rise more closely as it could have altered my results for the better. ?? ?? ?? ?? ...read more.

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Response to the question

The response to the question was done well overall. The candidate outlined the process of the experiment well and the format of the essay was well done apart from the font and bright colours used. The essay lacked scientific depth ...

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Response to the question

The response to the question was done well overall. The candidate outlined the process of the experiment well and the format of the essay was well done apart from the font and bright colours used. The essay lacked scientific depth behind the reasoning which is what lets this essay down.

Level of analysis

The introduction is adequate as it sums up the aim of the experiment in a concise way. The prediction is good, but the candidate should back this up with some form of scientific evidence and consideration. The risk assessment is outlined okay, but the reasons for doing each safety measure should be explained so the other readers know exactly why certain things they do can be hazardous. The equipment and reasons are outlined well. Why certain factors are controlled should be explained. The diagram of the experiment is good but it should really have distinct labels so we know exactly how the items should look. The preliminary work doesn't really say what they did learn and how they applied it to the experiment which needed to be mentioned. Table of results far too bright in colours to read. The conclusion is adequate, but it doesn't really suggest any improvements and errors that may have occurred and the improvement suggested is not explained at all, this should be done to show better understanding of how the experiment went.

Quality of writing

Text very pale and hard to read in the current format. The method should be outlined in bullet point format to make it easier to follow. Grammar, spelling and punctuation fine.


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Reviewed by skatealexia 02/08/2012

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