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The aim of this experiment is to investigate the relationship of the height of the vertical drop and the horizontal distance traveled by an object when it rolls down a slope and experiences a free fall.

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Physics Investigation                Eugene Ng 12S

Ski Jump

Aim:

The aim of this experiment is to investigate the relationship of the height of the vertical drop and the horizontal distance traveled by an object when it rolls down a slope and experiences a free fall.

Introduction:

Ski jump is one of the events in the Winter Olympic. This sport event involves a steep ramp and a landing zone. The main aim of this sport event is that the skier has to travel as far as possible after leaving the ramp horizontally. It is the motion in the air and the range that the skier travels we are concerned with. This motion is called the projectile motion. The displacement, velocity and acceleration of the projectile are all vectors. The forces of the projectile motion can be treated separately. They can be resolved into horizontal and vertical components. They are independent of each other; that is, neither motion affects the other. In my experiment, I would create a similar model of the ski jump. I will use a plastic track as the slope and model the skier as a metal ball.

Method:

Firstly, I will have to set up the ramp in the right position. I am going to bend the ramp into a curved shape. I will hold up one end of the ramp by the clamp stand and the other end will be placed horizontally on the table. It is very important to place the end of the ramp horizontally because we have to ensure that the initial velocity vector has no vertical component: uy=0. In order to make sure that the end of the ramp is placed horizontally, I will clamp a ruler on the side of the table and the tip of the ruler will prevents the ramp moving forward.

...read more.

Middle

72.68

3.33%

1.37%

Vertical distance from the horizontal launching level (h2) ±1.0cm

Total horizontal distance travelled (range)  ±1.0cm

Percentage Error (%) for (h2)

1.0 (uncertainty) x 100

40.0

Percentage Error (%) for range

1.0 (uncertainty) x 100

Actual Result

40.0

75.8

2.5%

1.31%

40.0

76.5

2.5%

1.30%

40.0

77.3

2.5%

1.29%

40.0

78

2.5%

1.28%

40.0

78.4

2.5%

1.27%

Average:

77.2

2.5%

1.29%

Vertical distance from the horizontal launching level (h2) ±1.0cm

Total horizontal distance travelled (range)  ±1.0cm

Percentage Error (%) for (h2)

1.0 (uncertainty) x 100

50.0

Percentage Error (%) for range

1.0 (uncertainty) x 100

Actual Result

50.0

81.4

2%

1.22%

50.0

82

2%

1.21%

50.0

81

2%

1.23%

50.0

82.2

2%

1.22%

50.0

81.6

2%

1.22%

Average distance:

81.64

2%

1.22%

Vertical distance from the horizontal launching level (h2) ±1.0cm

Total horizontal distance travelled (range)  ±1.0cm

Percentage Error (%) for (h2)

1.0 (uncertainty) x 100

60.0

Percentage Error (%) for range

1.0 (uncertainty) x 100

Actual Result

60.0

85.7

1.67%

1.16%

60.0

85.6

1.67%

1.17%

60.0

85.8

1.67%

1.16%

60.0

85.4

1.67%

1.17%

60.0

85.7

1.67%

1.16%

Average distance:

85.64

1.67%

1.16%

Vertical distance from the horizontal launching level (h2) ±1.0cm

Total horizontal distance travelled (range)  ±1.0cm

Percentage Error (%) for (h2)

1.0 (uncertainty) x 100

70.0

Percentage Error (%) for range

1.0 (uncertainty) x 100

Actual Result

70.0

89.9

1.43%

1.11%

70.0

90.5

1.43%

1.10%

70.0

90.2

1.43%

1.11%

70.0

89.8

1.43%

1.11%

70.0

90.4

1.43%

1.10%

Average distance:

90.16

1.43%

1.106%

Vertical distance from the horizontal launching level (h2) ±1.0cm

Total horizontal distance travelled (range)  ±1.0cm

Percentage Error (%) for (h2)

1.0 (uncertainty) x 100

80.0

Percentage Error (%) for range

1.0 (uncertainty)

...read more.

Conclusion

-2.

In this investigation, I have taken account the h2 as my variable and all other factors are being fixed. I can also investigate h1 if I will do this experiment again. It is different from h2 because the difference in launching height gives different initial velocity and therefore gives different horizontal distance travelled.

Conclusion:

The conclusion to this experiment is that the vertical projecting level increases with the horizontal distance traveled and the horizontal component should always be the same in theory. However, it is the air resistance that limits the projectile motion. From my results, it shows that air resistance only has a little effect on the metal ball if the time is less. However, if the metal ball travels in the air longer, the air resistance opposes the action longer and affects the horizontal distance traveled. It also proves that air resistance is a big limiting factor. This is the reason that makes the line on the graph bend slightly. It starts to bend at the point of 50-60cm. This turning point shows the effect of air resistance and the horizontal distance also starts to decrease at a bigger interval at that point.

...read more.

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