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The effect of different concentrations of Iron (III) Chloride with the mass loss of copper.

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Introduction

The effect of different concentrations of Iron (III) Chloride with the mass loss of copper. The aim of my investigation is to study the effect of the rate at which copper is fixed by different concentrations of Iron (III) Chloride. I will place copper strips in varying concentrations of Iron (III) Chloride, and then record results and interpret them. The reaction above is used in technology. Printed Circuit Boards are thin, flat boards made from non-conduction materials eg.plastic. Chips and other components are mounted on to them. The PCB starts off as a sheet of plastic coated with a layer of copper. It is placed into a tank containing a concentrated solution of Iron (III) Chloride to remove the excess copper and the protected copper, which remains become the PCB tracks. This is the formulae of the reaction which takes place between copper and Fe3+ ions shown below: Cu (s) + 2Fe3+ (aq) Cu2+ (aq) +2Fe2+ (aq) It is a REDOX reaction. This means that the copper is reduced as it has lost 2 electrons. It becomes a Cu2+ ion . The iron is oxidised, as it has gained 2 electrons and therefore it becomes a Fe2+ ion as demonstrated below. Cu - 2e- Cu2+ Fe3+ + e- Fe2+ I have studied kinetics in detail. And I have 6 different experiments which can all be related to our coursework. ...read more.

Middle

I am suggesting this because when I completed the Magnesium and Hydrochloric acid kinetics experiment, I observed that as the concentration of the HCL increased; the rate at which the magnesium dissolved also increased. Therefore, I think the same will happen with the Iron (III) Chloride and copper. Apparatus To complete the experiment I will need the following apparatus. o a strip of copper o A ruler o A scriber and scissors to cut the strip o Two burettes (one with 2M chloride and one with distilled water.) o A test tube to hold the solutions o A flushing beaker to flush out the solution o A squeeze bottle to clean the copper strip of the solution and stop the reaction. o A stop clock- to time the reaction. o A test tube to carry out the experiment o A balance to measure the mass of the strip of copper o A small beaker to mix each dilution o A bottle of iron chloride o A bottle of distilled water In order for me to successfully complete the experiment, I will need to: * Measure and cut the strip of copper. * Weigh the piece of copper, for the initial mass * Set up two burettes, on with iron chloride, and the other with distilled water. * Put 50cm of iron chloride into the test tube. ...read more.

Conclusion

As you can see, as the concentration increases, so too, does the mass loss. I think this is because there are more collisions happening with Iron Chloride and copper particles. If the concentration is greater, then more ions are present hence more collisions. Consequently, a faster reaction rate. Evaluation When I completed my graph, I realised that I did not have any anomalous results. I feel this is because we used accurate measures and followed the method meticulously. However as in all experiments, there were things that could be improved. * I realised that we had cut our strips from the same sheet of copper to a standard size. Our aim was to create identical strips so as to ensure a fair test but when we weighed the strips, they were different weights, which means that they were not exactly the same size and so did not have exactly the same surface area. * Another problem is cross-contamination of the test tube. If some of the previous solution remains in the test tube, then the next solution could be affected and the change in mass will be greater or less than it should be. * I also think that perhaps, the two strips of copper were not put in at the exact same time therefore this could cause anomalies. In conclusion, I have realised that my theory was in fact correct. The concentration of a solution plays a very important role in the rate of reaction as they are directly proportional to each other. ...read more.

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