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The Effect of Temperature on the Rate of Photosynthesis.

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Introduction

The Effect of Temperature on the Rate of Photosynthesis Jas Singh 10D In all plants, a process called photosynthesis takes place. Photosynthesis is the process where by light energy is converted to chemical energy. It makes sugars and the by-product oxygen from CO2 and water, using the energy of sunlight. Photosynthesis occurs in chloroplasts. Here are the word and symbol equations for the process: Carbon Dioxide + Water Gluecose + Oxygen 6CO2 + 6H20 C6H12O6 + 6O2 In my investigation, I am going to investigate the effect of temperature on the rate of photosynthesis. The plant I am gong to use is pondweed. Prediction: I believe that the temperature surrounding the plant will have a significant effect on the rate of photosynthesis. I believe this because temperature affects all chemical reactions, and that photosynthesis should be no exception. I think that the rate of photosynthesis will steadily increase to begin with until around 30�C, where I think it will steady off. Then at 40�C I believe that the rate of photosynthesis will sharply decrease until it reaches zero. I think this because - as with all chemical reactions - enzymes are required. All enzymes have optimum levels at which they work best, and so I think that this point for the enzyme which acts on the plant during photosynthesis is around 40�C. From my own knowledge, I know that enzymes - after a certain point - will denature very quickly, and so that is why I have predicted that after the optimum point at ...read more.

Middle

Another way to do this would be to count how many bubbles the plant produces in a certain time, but that is slightly less accurate and so I have decided to do this instead. Also, there is a chance of a human error where I may miss a bubble being produced, so I have decided to use the other method instead. I intend to change the temperature and then see what impact that has on the amount of oxygen produced, and so thus the rate of photosynthesis. * I will collect the oxygen in a measuring cylinder, as the oxygen will displace the water in the tube and so I will be able to have an accurate recording of how much was given off. To make my results as reliable as possible, I am going to repeat each reading 3 times, and so thus take a total of 36 recordings * In this experiment, I will need to keep three things at the same level. These three things are light intensity, carbon dioxide levels and the volume of the water. * To keep the light intensity constant, I intend to place a lamp at exactly 20cm away from the plant each time to ensure the light the plant receives each recording will be the same and so not change the result. To keep the water level the same, I will simply fill the beaker of water up to a certain point each time, say 850ml. ...read more.

Conclusion

So, a redrawn diagram of my apparatus has been included underneath. Modifications - After carrying out the experiment, I realised my method was not going to be able to be carried out. I stated that I would start recording at 0�C and then work my way up to about 60�C. In the investigation, I was able to go up to 60�C but I was unable to start my recording at 0�C. In the end, I had to start at 20�C. This was because even after putting in lots of ice, the temperature was taking a long time to decrease, and due to the time constraints upon me, I decided to start at 20�C. This was a good choice as I was able to then obtain 3 results for temperatures increasing by 5�C each time up to 60�C. Also, I decided to place the lamp right next to the beaker, not 20cm away from the beaker as I had originally planned. This had to be done because I realized that the time I was given meant that I had to get the plant producing bubbles quickly, and so I could not risk wasting time waiting for the plant to do so. I moved the lamp right next to the beaker so that would hopefully speed up the rate of photosynthesis and thus the rate that oxygen was produced. It was successful and I was able to obtain my results in time. ...read more.

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