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The Ethics and Science of Cloning - Where to Draw the Line.

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Introduction

The Ethics and Science of Cloning: Where to Draw the Line In theory, human cloning might seem appealing, but actual reproductive cloning could be disastrous. Compared to reproductive cloning therapeutic cloning seems less controversial. To me, however, I am not clear either is ethical. I do agree with a political cartoon by Kirk Anderson, which depicts the issue at hand as a runaway train. Genetic technology really is like a runaway train going too fast for people to jump on easily. To understand the ethicality of cloning we must understand the process. First the nucleus or DNA is removed from a cell. Then it is placed in an egg that has had its nucleus removed. Finally, the egg is incubated for a little while in the test tube and then placed inside of its mother. In general there are two types of cloning, therapeutic and reproductive. Therapeutic cloning is used to improve or change an already living thing. ...read more.

Middle

As you know animals is the next level of cloning. My first example is a cow. Again we would therapeutically clone a cow and then reproductively clone the new, improved cow. In the realm of therapeutically cloning a cow, we might think to create a cow that produces lactose free milk, and, if we can make lactose free milk why not therapeutically clone to force cows to make chocolate milk? So then we again would need to draw the line. Also to prevent cruelty to animals, farmers might therapeutically clone a cow so that it is born unconscious or without a head, so that there would be no need to slaughter. But the animal rights people would go on to say that it is cruel to the mother to have a dead baby. With animals reproductive cloning could be a great thing for a species that is going to be extinct. Although, if you are allowed to clone in this case can we clone to recreate our favorite pet? ...read more.

Conclusion

Factor.". The "Yuk! Factor" is something that every scientific and specifically medical advance goes through. So, with human cloning we should not jump to conclusions too soon. To sum up we should not make a decision to clone until the train slows down and we have a chance to be the engineers on a track we want to be on. Until then we just need to wait and see. And scientifically speaking, the cloning technology could be amazing. We would be able clone any living thing from a whole arm to a flower; every thing can be reproduced identically; or altered so slightly so that it is absolutely perfect. But the world is just not quite ready to take on the endeavor of this much scientific advance so fast. Genetic technology is quite like a runaway train going too fast for it to be analyzed and criticized, to be found ethical or not. The Ethics and Science of Cloning: Where to Draw the Line 2 ...read more.

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