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The experiment which I carried out aimed to monitor the quantity of Copper (Cu) metal that deposited during the electrolysis of Copper Sulphate solution (CuSo4) using Copper electrodes, when certain variables were changed.

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Introduction

Chemistry Coursework Jovan Djordjevic Year 10 Electrolysis Experiment Variables: The experiment which I carried out aimed to monitor the quantity of Copper (Cu) metal that deposited during the electrolysis of Copper Sulphate solution (CuSo4) using Copper electrodes, when certain variables were changed. The following factors could affect the experiment: 1.) Time 2.) Current 3.) Temperature 4.) Size of the Electrodes 5.) Distance between the electrodes Procedure: Copper Sulphate solution (50cm3) was poured into a small beaker. The two copper electrodes were firstly cleaned using water. ...read more.

Middle

the current was switched off and both electrodes were removed from the solution. They were then washed with water. Once clean and dry both electrodes were both carefully weighed and we recorded their masses. Diagram: + - Cables Copper Anode Copper Cathode CuSO4 Solution List of Apparatus Used: Electronic balance Stop watch Box of matches Measuring cylinder Glass beaker Wooden splints Bunsen burner (with inflammable pad) Copper Sulphate Solution Copper Electrodes Ammeter Battery set (cell) Cables Crocodile clips Results Tables: *The original weight of the cathode was 3.77g Time Current (A) ...read more.

Conclusion

One of these factors could have been the electrodes, which, even after a good clean were still quite dirty and obviously still had irremovable substances from previous experiments still attached to them. If this experiment were to be repeated for a second time, in need of greater accuracy, it would be better to have a new pair of electrodes, which have never been used before. I found this experiment interesting and am looking forward to investigating more of the variables in this experiment in the future. ...read more.

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