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The Study Of the Motion Of A Falling Cake Case With Reference To Terminal Velocity

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Jonathan Suleyman                20/04/2007

The Study Of the Motion Of A Falling Cake Case With Reference To Terminal Velocity

Introduction:

I am going to study and analyse the motion of a falling cake case with reference to Terminal Velocity.

What is Terminal Velocity?

Terminal Velocity is the maximum speed attained by a falling object. And to find the terminal velocity of my falling cake cases I will use the equation

Speed = Distance

         Time

Method

I have devised a fair test to study the motion of a falling cake case. I will be using the following equipment to carry out my experiment.

  • 2 x 1 metre rulers
  • Stopwatch
  • 5 cake cases
  • Stand
  • Clamp

         Clamp

        20cm

        Eye level

            Stand

        180cm

        Bench Top

Will I have a fair Test?

To ensure that I am carrying out a fair test I have taken some steps to do so. Firstly I made sure that all the cake cases are all the same size and shape

I will vary two factors in my experiment

  • Drop height
  • Weight of the cake case

...read more.

Middle

1.20

1.19

1.51

150 cm

0.94

1.00

1.06

1.00

1.5

120 cm

0.84

0.80

0.82

0.82

1.46

90 cm

0.73

0.66

0.70

0.69

1.30

60 cm

0.46

0.48

0.44

0.46

1.30

30 cm

0.34

0.30

0.27

0.30

1

2 Cake Cases

Drop Height

Time 1 (In sec)

Time 2 (In sec)

Time 3 (In sec)

Average time (In sec)

Terminal Velocity (m/s)

180 cm

0.81

0.88

0.81

0.83

2.1

150 cm

0.74

0.77

0.77

0.76

1.9

120 cm

0.70

0.62

0.63

0.65

1.8

90 cm

0.50

0.48

0.57

0.51

1.7

60 cm

0.35

0.48

0.40

0.41

1.4

30 cm

0.30

0.24

0.23

0.25

1.2

Drop Height

Time 1 (In sec)

Time 2 (In sec)

Time 3 (In sec)

...read more.

Conclusion

Evaluation

The majority of my results were accurate, but when the drop height was placed to a height of 30cm, some of the lighter cake cases did drop faster than the heavier ones, which did seem very strange to me. This part of my experiment did not support my prediction, which was that heavier cake cases dropped faster than lighter ones. These were uncharacteristic results. The reason why I may have gotten these anomalous results may have been due to human error.

        I believe that I should have repeated the recordings for the 30cm drop height so that I could possibly get more reliable results.

        The method that I used is a high quality method so I would stick to it.

I gathered a suitable range of results for my experiment to be able to come to a reliable conclusion.

        From my graphs there does seem to be a pattern in my results and therefore the patters would continue beyond the range of data that I collected.

...read more.

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE Forces and Motion section.

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