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Thermal decomposition of Copper Carbonate (CuCo3).

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Introduction

08 December 2003 Lehaz m kaker Thermal decomposition of Copper Carbonate (CuCo3) Plan: Introduction: In this experiment I'm going to identify the correct balanced stiochiometric chemical equation for the decomposition of the copper carbonate from the volume of carbon dioxide produced. Green powder of the copper carbonate is decomposed by heat. Two different equations are possible for this reaction. Equation 1: 2 CuCo3(s) Cu2O(s) + 2Co2(g) + O2 (g) Equation 2: CuCo3(s) Cuo(s) + Co2(g) We are to find the accurate equation for the decomposition of the CuCo3 from the volume of carbon dioxide produced from the known amount of copper carbonate decomposed. Safety: 1: Eye protection and lab coat must be worn. 2: Keep the bags and coat and other stuff away from the experimental area, as this is a flame involve practical. May cause trip falls. ...read more.

Middle

(High flame is not needed as the copper carbonate burns on a low blue flame) As the Carbon dioxide is collected in cylinder the water is replaced from graduation cylinder. When the CuCo3 decomposed completely the bubbles stop. 7) Waite until the temperature of carbon dioxide cool down to room temperature, because the volume of gas changes with temperature and pressure. Measure the temperature in water as it is replaced with Co2 gas. But water react with carbon dioxide while we wait, which will affect the volume of Co2 gas. To prevent this reaction we have to saturate the water with carbon dioxide gas by passing the Co2 through water. 8) After the Co2 cooled down to room temperature read the meniscus of water carefully and record the volume of carbon dioxide collected in the graduation cylinder. Result: Mass of sample (CuCo3)+sample-container = ...g Mass of sample residues+sample-container =...g Mass of sample (CuCo3) ...read more.

Conclusion

of O2 =...g In equation 2: The ratio between CuCo3 to Co2 is 1:1, so No of moles of CuCo3 = No of mole of Co2 Or 1 mole of Co2 = 24dm3 at 25C and 1 atm pressure X moles of Co2 = volume of Co2 produced at 25C and 1 atm pressure No of mole of Co2 = volume of Co2 produced in dm3 / 24dm3 Molar mass of Co2 = 44g Mass of Co2 = no of moles of Co2 X 44 = ...g Mass of Co2 =...g When we performed the above calculation now we can deduce the no of moles and mass of the product formed from the decomposition of the copper carbonate. Conclusion: The correct balanced stiochiometric equation for the thermal decomposition of copper carbonate can be deduce while carry out the experiment and measure the correct amount of CuCo3 decomposed and the volume of carbon dioxide produced by applying the above calculation. ...read more.

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