• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month
Page
  1. 1
    1
  2. 2
    2
  3. 3
    3
  4. 4
    4
  5. 5
    5
  6. 6
    6
  7. 7
    7
  8. 8
    8
  9. 9
    9

Titration to analyse a solution of dilute sulphuric acid, and calculating the concentration of acid that it contains.

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Titration to analyse a solution of dilute sulphuric acid, and calculating the concentration of acid that it contains. Introduction/Aim: In this coursework my aim is to find out how much acid there is in a solution. I am going to use the technique of titration to analyse a solution of dilute sulphuric acid, and calculate the concentration of acid that it contains. This concentration is considerably greater than the concentration of acid in "acid rain", but the same method of analysis could be used to determine accurate values of PH for "acid rain" samples. I must find out the accurate concentration of acid, which is thought to have a concentration between 0.05 and 0.15 mol dm-3. The purpose of this experiment is to obtain an accurate concentration of sulphuric acid, which is found in solution. We are told that the sulphuric acid to be used has a concentration between 0.05 and 0.15 mol dm, but the task is to clarify the exact concentration using the method of titration. The indicators that I can use are either phenolphthalein or methyl orange this is because according to the titration curve for strong acid with strong base, the pH range for methyl orange (3.1-4.4) ...read more.

Middle

> Use a pipette and a pipette filler to transfer 10.0 cm3 of the acid rain sample to a 100 cm3 conical flask. > Add 3 drops of Methyl orange indicator. > Fill burette with 0.01 mol dm-3 sodium hydroxide solution. > Make sure the burette jet is also full of solution. > Record the volume reading in the burette before starting the titration. > Add sodium hydroxide solution in small volumes to the acid rain solution in the conical flask. > Gently swirl the flask after each addition. > The Methyl orange indicator should turn from a orange to a yellow colour. > Run in the small volumes of sodium hydroxide solution until there is a colour change from yellow to orange colour in the titration mixture. > This is the end point. > Record the final burette reading. > Now calculate the volume of hydroxide solution that has been used. > The 1st attempt that is done would be a rough titration. > From this rough attempt I should now have an idea of what the end point is. > After this rough titration I will do several more titrations until I record three volumes that agree to within 0.1 cm3. ...read more.

Conclusion

I feel it was best to have the acid placed in the burette rather than it in the conical flask, because it's easier to note the colour change from yellow to orange, than orange to yellow. I know that the errors that may have occurred during the experiment were minor and did not have a great impact on my final result, however I still feel that the main source of my error in carrying out the titration was where I had to distinguish where the indicator had changes colour. This is the reason for why I had to estimate an end point between the beginning and end point of the colour change. I used this method throughout all 3 of my titrations. If I was to ever do this experiment again I would make sure that I used a pH meter to distinguish the neutralization point. Even though by doing this it would not have a great impact on my titre, it will however make the investigation much more reliable and not subject to the choice of individual colour change. Also if I had more time to do this experiment I would do more titres rather than just 1 rough titre and three others. I would do several titres in order to compare them with one another. Ifrah Naz ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE Aqueous Chemistry section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE Aqueous Chemistry essays

  1. Marked by a teacher

    Chem MC analysis. In which of the following cases may it obtain a complete ...

    5 star(s)

    = 0.002mol Number of moles of KOH given: 0.200X (30.0/1000) = 0.006mol Mole ratio of H3PO4: KOH = 0.002 /0.006 = 1:3 Therefore, option (3) is correct. Option 4: HCl(aq) + NaOH(aq)--> NaCl(aq) +H2O(l) Using the formula, Molarity of a solution M or mol dm3 = Number of moles of solute (mol)

  2. Acid-Base titration of Sulphuric acid and Sodium Hydroxide

    * After I obtained my reading I emptied the burette and other apparatuses and rinsed them thoroughly with distilled water. RESULTS DATA COLLECTION Experiment number Initial burette reading (�0.05)cm3 Final burette reading (�0.05)cm3 Volume of H2SO4 used in cc (�0.1)cm3 1 0 23.8 23.8 2 0 24.0 24.0 3 0

  1. Planning of Titration

    spitted on the wall of the flask * I will use 4 decimal places for all my calculations except for the answer which will be in 3 decimal places. This will give me more accurate results. * For all of my trials of experiment I will compare the colour change so that they are as similar as possible.

  2. The effect of Acid Rain on Seed Germination.

    Firstly when I was measuring out the water and the acid rain mixture with a syringe it proved to be a little difficult and so the volumes in each Petri-dish may not have been exactly equal. There may have also been a little of the acid rain mixture or water

  1. Determine the concentration of sulphuric acid by acid-base titration.

    * Burette: is used to deliver precisely-measured Sulphuric acid to the flask, the burette also able you to read titres to 2 decimal places therefore it very accurate. * Clam stand: used to hold the burette. * 25cm3 pipettes: A pipette is used to measure small amounts of sodium carbonate very accurately.

  2. In order to find out the exact concentration of sulphuric acid, I will have ...

    White tile - is necessary to identify the colour change and the eventual neutralisation point during the titration. Wash bottle - has a small in diameter nozzle, which can fit inside conical flask, beaker, etc and is used to store non-ionised water.

  1. Titration I will neutralize the sulphuric acid with a base, which will be Sodium ...

    this amount to work out the concentration of Sulphuric acid To calculate the concentration of sulphuric acid I first need to calculate the number of moles of sodium Carbonate used Volume x Concentration I have to find out the number of mols of Sodium Carbonate used (25/1000)

  2. The Use of Volumetric Flask, Burette and Pipette in Determining the Concentration of NaOH ...

    A weak acid-weak base titration have a small pH change at the equivalence point. This small change is difficult to observe and detect, as a result the weak acid-weak base titrations are not common. We must be use a standard for which the amount of substance present is known, one

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work