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To determine the concentration of a lime water solution

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Introduction

Skill P: Planning Greig Rawlings To determine the concentration of a lime water solution Definition * My task is to plan an experiment to find the accurate concentration of the limewater solution which is roughly 1gdm-3. * To do this I am going to do a titration using hydrochloric acid which I will need to dilute * I am provided with 250cm3 of limewater, 2.00mldm-3 of Hydrochloric acid and an indicator * I hypothesise that if I double the concentration of acid then the amount required to neutralise the calcium hydroxide will decrease by two because it is well know that if you double the concentration of something you will only need half the amount to have the same effect. Application * There is a standard equation for a reaction of a metal hydroxide and hydrochloric acid: M(OH)2 + 2HCL MCl2 + 2H20 (M = metal) ...read more.

Middle

/ 50cm3 = concentration = 0.1 moldm-3 Mr of Calcium hydroxide = 74 gdm-3 = 74 x 0.1 = 7.4 gdm-3 * I will use methyl orange indicator because the limewater is a weak base so methyl orange has an endpoint of 5 - 8 on the pH scale where as phenolphthalein indicator has a much higher end point this means that the end point would be reached before the equivalence. Variable Control * You need t ensure that you take your chemicals from the same batch so as not to get two different concentrations each time you test them. * Temperature and pressure should have no effect on the reaction Organisation 1. Set up the equipment as shown in the diagram below, ensuring that the burette valve is closed. 2. Run de-ionised water through the burette and wash all of the equipment with it 3. ...read more.

Conclusion

* 500cm3 Volumetric Flask * 250cm3 Conical Flask * Burette * White tile * Clamp and Stand * In addition to this you will need: * 250ml of Calcium Hydroxide solution * 25ml of 2.00mol Hydrochloric acid * De-ionised Water * Indicator (methyl orange) * Apparatus set up: Risk Assessment * Hydrochloric acid is corrosive and so it is necessary to wear goggles, lab coats and gloves * Calcium hydroxide can also be dangerous to the eyes so again safety goggles are important * Also care needs to be taken when diluting the hydrochloric acid as they react violently so the acid should always be added to the water slowly and not the other way around. * If any chemical comes into contact with the eyes then they need to be washed using an eyewash. With the low strengths in this experiment medical attention does not necessarily need to be immediately sought unless serious. ...read more.

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