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To find out how much dilute hydrochloric acid (HCI) is needed to neutralise 25mls of sodium hydroxide solution (NaOH).

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Introduction

Aim: To find out how much dilute hydrochloric acid (HCI) is needed to neutralise 25mls of sodium hydroxide solution (NaOH). Equipment: ? Beakers ? Burette ? Stand and clamps ? Conical flask ? Eye protection ? Pipette ? Hydrochloric acid ? Sodium hydroxide Solution ? Measuring cylinder ? pH chart ? Small funnel ? ...read more.

Middle

(Making sure you pour it up to exactly 0) 3. Get 25ml of Sodium hydroxide and pour it into the conical flask. 4. Add a few drops of Universal Indicator liquid to the sodium hydroxide. ...read more.

Conclusion

7. Keep doing this process in steps of 2cm until you reach you reach about 18cm. Then start letting out the hydrochloric solution in 1cms. And as the solution is near to turning green (Neutral) let the solution out in shorter measurements (i.e. 0.5cm) 8. Record the results and then repeat the whole process twice more. Roziana Wan Ramli 10S Chemistry Coursework Set B3 Mrs Chana ...read more.

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