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To find out how quickly 25mls of Sodium Thiosulphate of different temperatures reacts with Hydrochloric acid to turn the solution cloudy.

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Introduction

Alastair Drohan 2nd July 2001 Chemistry Course-work Aim: To find out how quickly 25mls of Sodium Thiosulphate of different temperatures reacts with Hydrochloric acid to turn the solution cloudy. Apparatus: Heated Water bath, to get the Sodium Thiosulphate to the required temperature, Sodium Thiosulphate, to mix with the Hydrochloric acid, Hydrochloric acid, to mix with the Sodium Thiosulphate, conical flask, to put the solution in whilst conducting the experiment, beakers, to mix the solution in, pipette, to transport the liquids with, bench mat, to protect the bench, laminated paper with a cross on, to tell when the experiment was done, and stop clock, to time how long the mixing process took. Method: I took 25 ml Sodium Thiosulphate and heated it until it reached 70?. Whilst this was heating I set up the rest of my equipment as is shown. ...read more.

Middle

This was because when heated the particles in the Thiosulphate were more active and flowing a lot more freely and were able to mix with the acid quicker. In the colder solution the particles weren't as lively and therefore weren't able to mix with the acid as quickly. When the temperature changed and got cooler the times got longer, this shows that if the Sodium Thiosulphate is heated to a higher temperature it is going to react quicker. Evaluation: In this kind of experiment there are a lot of variables and the variable that I changed was the temperature of the Sodium Thiosulphate, however there were many variables that were very difficult to keep the same and these were as follows: when the clock is started, when the cross is not visible and exactly how much liquid is being used. ...read more.

Conclusion

I felt that this was a successful experiment and I felt that I had performed well to keep it a very fair test and I was contented with my results. When comparing results with people in the class I found that my theory of the higher the temperature the quicker the reaction was correct. I was satisfied with this experiment but I did find out afterwards that other people had used temperatures, which were a lot colder, and I was disappointed that I didn't think of that. For example instead of 70?, 60?, 50?, 40? and 30? other people had used temperatures such as 10? and 5?. I think if I was doing the experiment again then I would have incorporated some colder temperatures as well as the high ones. ...read more.

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