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To find out how temperature affects the rate of reaction using a range of temperatures from 5oC to 55oC.

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Introduction

Rate of Reaction Aim To find out how temperature affects the rate of reaction using a range of temperatures from 5oC to 55oC. Prediction A chemical reaction is where bonds break and atoms collide to form other substances. I predict that as you raise the temperature the rate of reaction will increase. The reaction occurs because two atoms and form a new substance. The new chemical is different to the old one. More then two atoms can collide to make a new substance. A chemical change must occur. You start with one compound and turn it into another. That's an example of a chemical change. A steel garbage can rust. That rusting happens because the iron in the metal combines with oxygen in the atmosphere. ...read more.

Middle

If the atoms move more they will also collide more therefore making the reaction quicker. Apparatus 6 Conical flasks 6 Measuring cylinders Stopwatch Hydrochloric acid 120cm3 Sodium Thiosulphate Cardboard Cross Bunsen Burner Ice Thermometer Tripod Tongs Splint Wire Gauze Match Method We either heat or cool the Sodium Thiosulphate to the desired temperature and we put the conical flask on the 'X'. We then add the acid and time how long it takes for the 'X' to disappear. We will not contaminate the two liquids, to prevent this we will use separate equipment for the Thiosulphate and the acid. To make it a fair test we will use equal amounts of thiosulphate and acid measured carefully in a measuring cylinder. I will be doing the experiment at a range of 5oC, 15oC, 25oC, 35oC, 45oC, and 55oC. ...read more.

Conclusion

My results prove this. Evaluation My measurements were very accurate because I measured it myself. If I had used a burette my measurements would have been more accurate. There were no abnormal results in my experiment I know this because on the graph the results form a smooth curve, I believe that my results are accurate because I repeated the experiment three times. To get other results I wound use concentration and temperature. I would use different concentrations like 3/4 acid and 1/4 thiosulphate. I would also use a more accurate range of temperature like 5oC to 55oC but I will go up in five degrees at a time instead of ten degrees at a time. I could get the temperatures more accurate I could use an electric heater or a water bath. I would use these because it would stay at the temperature. I would also heat both liquids to make it more accurate and fair experiment. By Kyle Clark ...read more.

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