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To investigate and observe how the amplitude (angle of release), affects the time period of one oscillation of a pendulum.

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Introduction

Factor: Amplitude (angle of release.)

Aim – To investigate and observe how the amplitude (angle of release), affects the time period of one oscillation of a pendulum.

Prediction – As I conducted my preliminary experiments I found that as I increase the amplitude of the pendulum string the time for one oscillation increases. Hence I predict that as I increase the amplitude of the pendulum string the time period for one oscillation increases.

Hypothesis – In my prediction I stated that as I increase the amplitude of the pendulum string the time period for one oscillation increases. This is backed up on the scientific theory that if the pendulum is raised at a greater angle it will have to cover a greater distance. Also as it is raised higher it will have more gravitational potential energy than kinetic energy. The higher the angle is the greater the gravitational potential energy. Since there is more gravitational potential energy, it means that there will be less kinetic energy as less of the gravitational potential energy will be converted to kinetic energy, and that there is more distance to cover.

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Middle

Repeat these steps again. Except increase the amplitude of the string each time by 10° until 70°. E.g. 10°, 20°, 30°, 40°, 50°, 60°, 70°, 80°, 90°, 100°.Once the results have been collected and recorded. You will be able to calculate the time period for one oscillation from the average time period. This can be done by dividing the average time period by 10.

Results:

Time for 10 Oscillations

Amplitude Degrees (°)

1

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Conclusion

Evaluation:

The evidence obtained was reliable and the procedure used to obtain this evidence was accurate. The entire accuracy of both experiments was fairly good. Both experiments used aid of a human and a human made all the measurements which were vital for the success of the experiment. For the length factor my percentage error was very low which illustrated to me that the experiment was conducted accurately. The experiment in which amplitude was a factor was quite different as my results led me to believe something else. As I have said before my percentage error was very low this signifies that my results are able to support a firm conclusion. The reliability of my evidence is fairly good. In the experiment in which amplitude was a factor, the results were also reliable and I repeated my readings three times so that I could obtain and average. I did the same in the other experiment as well.

For further improvements to the investigation I would experiment in the mass of the bob and if it affects the time period of one oscillation. I would also be interested in calculating the speed at which the bob travels and how factors can affect this as well.

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