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To investigate one factor that will affect the rate of decomposition of hydrogen peroxide.

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Introduction

Aim: To investigate one factor that will affect the rate of decomposition of hydrogen peroxide * The word equation for the decomposition of hydrogen peroxide is: Hydrogen peroxide � oxygen + water The chemical equation is: 2H O � O + 2 H O * The rate of reaction is the rate at which the reactants react or products are being formed in relation to the time factor. The factors affecting the rate of reaction are as follows: 1) Temperature 2) Surface area 3) Concentration if the reactants are liquid or pressure if the reactants are gases. 4) Amount of catalyst 5) Type of catalyst * The chosen factor: Concentration * When I increase the concentration of the reactant ( in this case hydrogen Peroxide) the rate of reaction will increase (in this case the rate of production oxygen). The rate of reaction is directly proportional to the concentration. If I double the concentration, I expect that the rate of reaction will double as a result. Prediction The rate of reaction means the rate at which H O (l) and O (g) are formed, which is the same as the rate at which H O (aq) is used up. We would measure the rate of this reaction as moles of hydrogen peroxide used up per second. The rate of reaction for the decomposition of hydrogen peroxide I look more closely at the decomposition of hydrogen peroxide in solution. ...read more.

Middle

Then I will put one end of the glass tube in the conical flask and the other end in the measuring cylinder at the same time I will start the stop watch. Then I start to count the volume of oxygen for 30s, 60s, 90s, 120s, 150s, 180s, and write them down. Scientific reasons Tub of water- oxygen is not soluble in water. Measuring cylinder - easy to measure the volume of oxygen produced. Conical flask - facilitate through mixing of reactants. Stand - to fix the measuring cylinder firmly and upright. Glass tube - if it is a rubber tube, it is very difficult to insert through the water and it will be blocked by the measuring cylinder pressing on it by its own weight. Pipette - small volume of liquid could be transferred effectively. Balance- to measure the weight accurately. Test tube- small volume of liquids could be measured accurately. Stop watch - to measure the time accurately. The above comments are important because scientific experiments require accurate and precise measurements. Risk assessment Hydrogen peroxide: caution must be taken in handling hydrogen peroxide because it is irritative and burns the skin when it comes into contact with the skin. The results of the preliminary experiment are as follows: Volume of hydrogen peroxide ml Time s Volume of oxygen cm� 2 30 73 2 60 83 2 90 84 2 120 85 2 150 86 2 180 88 4 30 53 4 60 59 4 90 61 4 120 64 4 150 65 4 180 66 6 30 ...read more.

Conclusion

My results were not fully backed up by my conclusion. The results of the were not fully supporting the theory which states, that the rate of reaction increases proportionally to the increasing concentration of reactants. The course for the anomalies may be due to the following reason. 1) I have not put the cork on the opening of conical flask and not inserted the glass tube through the cork. Therefore there was a gap between the tube and the opening of the conical flask. Part of the oxygen would have leaked out of the conical flask instead of going through the tube in to the cylinder. 2) There was no co-ordination between the volume of oxygen produced and noting the time at the stop watch. 3) There would have been possibilities of not taking the exact quantities in Millilitre of hydrogen peroxide, when taking with pipette. Another way of testing the prediction The tip of the syringe (tube) is inserted through the hole in the cork, so that it tightly fit into the cork. First add 8ml water in the conical flask and then add 2ml of hydrogen peroxide. Both with the help of the pipette. Then magnesium oxide is added to the conical flask. The conical flask is closed by the cork carrying the syringe. The volume of oxygen produced can be measured for the time intervals of 30s, 60s, 90s, 120s, 150s, 180s. the concentration could be varied according to the following schedule. Hydrogen peroxide Water Concentration 2 8 20% 4 6 40% 6 4 60% 8 2 80% 10 0 100% ...read more.

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