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To investigate the effect of temperature on the volume of a gas

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Introduction

Physics Lab Ali Dakik Charles's Law Date of Lab: 30th August 2005 Aim: To investigate the effect of temperature on the volume of a gas, given that the pressure acting on the gas is fixed. Hypothesis: According to Charles's Law, the volume of a given amount of gas is directly proportional to the absolute temperature when the pressure is constant. Thus, it is expected that as the temperature of the gas increases, its volume will increase also at a constant rate. When the temperature is increased, the particles in the gas gain more kinetic energy and as a result, the particles move faster and quicker and thus, the particles bombard each other more frequently. Because of this, the pressure exerted by the gas on its surroundings increase, creating an increase in the volume of the gas. ...read more.

Middle

Record your readings. * Gradually, heat the water in the beaker and at certain temperatures, measure the changing length of the air column. * Carry this out for a range of different temperature readings and record your obtained values in a table. Data Collection: The following table summarizes the obtained results. The temperatures are recorded in both Celsius and Kelvin Scales. The table allows us to compare how the length of air column changes with the increase in temperature. T(K)= T(?C)+ 273.15 Temperature T/?C Temperature T/K Length of air column L/cm �0.10 28 301 3.70 44 317 3.80 66 339 3.85 69 342 3.90 80 353 4.10 Data Processing and Presentation: To analyze how the increase in temperature affects the volume of a gas, the volume must first be calculated. We do this using the above table and the following formula: V=?r�L where V=volume, ?=pie=3.124, r=radius of glass tube, L=length of air column. ...read more.

Conclusion

This is evidence that the volume and temperature are directly proportional. However, the graph drawn does not greatly demonstrate the constant increase in volume. The straight line obtained is not exact and we cannot base our conclusion on this. To further investigate this property, more results must be obtained. Nevertheless, it is evident that the volume of a given amount of gas is directly proportional to the absolute temperature when the pressure is constant. Improving the Experiment: It would be useful to measure the radius of the glass tube using a micrometer. This would give exact values. Moreover, when the glass tube is removed from the beaker to record the air column, the temperature falls down rapidly. This causes a difficulty in recording exact results. Next time, 2 clamp stands should be used, so as to make it possible to leave the ruler next to the glass tube and not move it out of the water. The readings could be done while the glass tube stays in the water. ...read more.

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