• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month
Page
  1. 1
    1
  2. 2
    2
  3. 3
    3
  4. 4
    4
  5. 5
    5
  6. 6
    6
  7. 7
    7
  8. 8
    8
  9. 9
    9
  10. 10
    10
  11. 11
    11

To investigate the factors which might affect the resistance of a component.

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Electricity: Resistance Part 1 - Planning Aim: - To investigate the factors which might affect the resistance of a component. Background Information: - An electric current is a flow off electrons. Electricity comes from the Greek word Electra, which was the Goddess of lightening. Metals have a tight giant atomic structure i.e. they are made up of very tightly packed atoms with free electrons. Such materials make excellent conductors of electricity. When a voltage is applied the electrons begin to flow in an orderly manner. An electric current is said to flow through the material. How large a current flow depends on how hard the supply is trying to push the current through the circuit and how hard the circuit resists having a current pushed through it. The current depends on the voltage and the resistance. The only time Ohm's law will not work is if the wire becomes very hot because the electricity is on for too long, so Ohm's law would be lost. Preliminary Work Aim: - To investigate the factors which might affect the resistance of a component. Apparatus: - 1. Power Pack 2. Wires 3. Ammeter 4. Voltmeter 5. Crocodile Clips 6. Metal/Component (manganin) 7. Heat Resistant Board Method: - The ammeter will be attached to the component in series to the power pack, then the heat proof mat will be placed under the component in case of overheating and burning the table and then the voltmeter will be placed in parallel to the component to find the potential difference running from one end of the component to the other. ...read more.

Middle

Accuracy: - I plan to do this experiment as accurate as possible by doing the experiment twice. Predictions: - 1. I predict that the shorter the resistor the lesser the resistance because the electron particles have a shorter distance to travel so they will not endure resistance as much as the electron particles that go through a longer resistor. 2. I predict that the thicker the wire/resistor the lesser the resistance because the electron particles have more room to travel. 3. I predict that the copper will have the least resistance and the manganin will have the most resistance because Copper is more dense, tightly packed and has freely moving free electrons than compared to any of the other resistors. Part 2 - Obtaining Evidence Safety: - I am dealing with a resistor and electricity so I will wear goggles to protect my eyes from any sparks that generate from any mislaid part and will wear gloves, if I have access to a pair, to protect my hand from the resistor. Apparatus: - 1. Power Pack 2. Wires 3. Ammeter 4. Voltmeter 5. Crocodile Clips 6. Metal/Component (manganin) 7. Heat Resistant Board Method: - The ammeter will be attached to the component in series to the power pack, then the heat proof mat will be placed under the component in case of overheating and burning the table and then the voltmeter will be placed in parallel to the component to find the potential difference running from one end of the component to the other. ...read more.

Conclusion

the experiment by using different types of metals or use metals from group one of the periodic table and see if the lower you go in the periodic table the more resistive they become or visa versa. I think the plan is enough for others to understand if they feel the need to do the experiment again. I tried to be as accurate as possible. I cut the wires as accurately as possible and measured the readings as accurately as possible. The anomalous results could have occurred due to numerous things. I might have cut the wires to small or too big, the temperature of the room might have given the electrons more energy to move or I might have left the resistor resisting the electricity too long and the metal was burnt and I carried the experiment on with, you could say, a different resistor. This heating up of the resistor destroys Ohm's Law; the current being left on too long will cause the wire to expand destroying the Law. The atoms will then increasingly vibrate, the wire will then move apart, this will limit the movement of the electrons which will cause an invalidation of Ohms Law and this might have been the case for the anomalous results. A further extension of my work could include an investigation involving the effect of density on resistance. I would use extremes of density e.g.: 1. Titanium -4.50 g/cm 2. Germanium -5.46 g/cm 3. Zirconium -6.44 g/cm 4. Manganese -7.42 g/cm 5. Nickel -8.90 g/cm 6. Tungsten -19.10 g/cm 7. Gold -19.32 g/cm 8. Platinum -21.37 g/cm ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE Electricity and Magnetism section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE Electricity and Magnetism essays

  1. Construct and test an anemometer.

    Once a constant voltage was being produced, I could then adjust the stroboscope to produce more or less flashes per minute, until the cups appeared frozen in motion. To make this easier the practical was done in a dark room so the stroboscope was the only source of light.

  2. In this project I will investigate factors that effect resistance. But to first understand ...

    it is a straight line passing through the origin, doubling the p.d doubles the current and halving the p.d half's the current. There are four main factors which affect the resistance in a metallic object. They are length, thickness, material and temperature. Resistance can be better understood through a model.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work