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To peel the epidermis layer from underneath of the plant leaf and count the average distance between the stomata.

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Introduction

Stomata Count Experiment Aim To peel the epidermis layer from underneath of the plant leaf and count the average distance between the stomata. Background Info Guard cells open and close to let stomata take in Carbon Dioxide that is required for plants to make glucose in photosynthesis, the Carbon Dioxide comes in through stomata, which consist of guard cells which contract and relax (become turgid and flaccid) depending on the amount of water that inside them making them turgid. Each part of the leaf needs an equal amount of carbon dioxide; otherwise the part with less carbon dioxide would die. Prediction The distance between the stomata should be equal because each part of the leaf needs an equal amount of carbon dioxide. ...read more.

Middle

Tissues - to wipe excess glycerol from slides * Brush - to apply the nail varnish to the underside of the leaf. It should be available in the cap of the nail varnish Method 1. Take the leaf, open the nail varnish bottle and apply the nail varnish with the brush to the underside of the leaf. 2. Wait 5-10 minutes. 3. Rip the leaf in two halves. There should be a transparent layer visible. If not, rip one of the halves again and again until a sufficiently big piece can be peeled off. 4. Use the tweezers to peel off the piece of epidermis. ...read more.

Conclusion

Repeat 2 (gu) 1 2.2 2.4 2 1.3 6.1 3 4.1 2.5 4 0.8 7.4 5 3.7 3.2 6 1.5 4.5 7 0.7 6.2 8 5.6 0.5 9 4.1 0.9 10 1.2 1.1 Mean 2.5 3.5 Mean = 3gu Mean distance = 7.5 �m Analysis The distance between two stomata is on average 7.5 �m although I don't see how I can say that because the distances were not regular, not even in the same range, one was 0.5gu and another was 7.4gu, sometimes they looked as if they overlapped. Evaluation The experiment went well, I can't think of other experiments to investigate the same thing, and the equipment was fine. If I wanted to improve on this I would make more repeats. ...read more.

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