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Transmission of force by fluids.

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Transmission of force by fluids

Pascal’s law states:

  • Provided the effect of the weight of the fluid can be neglected, the pressure is the same throughout an enclosed volume of fluid at rest.
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Middle

When a pressure is applied to one end of an enclosed volume of fluid the pressure is transmitted equally to every other part of the fluid.

Pressure drop

When a fluid flows through a pipe, frictional forces will mean that energy is expended. This

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Conclusion

Thus doubling the volume rate flow quadruples the pressure drop per unit length of pipe.

In the barrage the oil is transported from the oil tank and through the pipes via a hydraulic pump when needed to open the sluice gates so the pressure drop must be taken into account.

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