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Types of tourism and the conflicts that arise between tourist types and the environment and how tourists are managed.

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Introduction For my GCSE Geography coursework I will be doing research on Rutland Water's environment and how tourism effects Rutland water's environment. The aim of this investigating is to see how the environment has changed and been managed and how it has been effected due to the number of tourists. I will also be asking many other questions within this coursework such as: * What is the tourism like at Rutland Water? * Has the tourism at Rutland water increased or decreased and why? * What attracts people to Rutland water and what are the main attraction points? * What is the environment like at Rutland Water? * How has the environment changed over the years? * What are the conflicts in land use? These questions will enable me to obtain information, which is relative to the main question and therefore, I will be able to answer it. Location of Rutland water Rutland water is based in between the three cities: Peterborough, Northampton and Leicester it is near the city of Rutland. Rutland is the smallest county in England and it has a rural landscape. The reason why Rutland water is located in this area, is due to the fact that there was a shortage of water here and so by building this reservoir there would be more water. Another reason why Rutland water was located here is as it is a natural valley for flooding and also by building it in this area it would not effect the public too much as there was not many house there it was mainly open land. ...read more.

Middle

There is an increasing number of people who go to Rutland water, for various reasons, they visit certain areas of Rutland for certain activities, which have been zoned: * Normanton - Fishing and sailing * Sykes lane - Children's play area, butterfly centre and cycling - Mainly for families * Whitwell - sailing and water sport activities * Egleton - Bird watching centre Egleton Egleton is situated in the west of Rutland water it offers a bird watching, which has many facilities which allows you to view many birds in their habitat and also provides information on birds. The bar chart above shows the main facilities, which are used by the members of public, and as you can see the main reason it is used for is for bird watching this is due to the fact that it has many bird hides: Photograph A: Photograph A demonstrates birds living in their habitat, these birds can be seen through the bird hides, which are located around Egleton. Egleton has approximately 10 bird hides for bird watchers to see the birds; it also has a Nature Reserve. Egleton is quite close to the A6003 so it is very easy for people to get by car as it also has a car park (photograph B). Normanton Normanton is located in the south-east of Rutland water its main attraction is the Normanton church museum this tells the story of this ancient valley but it is also used for fishing and sailing which is used widely by many people. ...read more.

Conclusion

The largest conflict with cyclists is between them and the people who live in Manton, as the cyclists have to ride past there as the path that could be built would be too close to the Nature reserve. Therefore, the path goes through Manton and the people living here do not like the noise caused by the cyclists. Conclusion After doing this investigation I have come to the conclusion that the environment of Rutland water is effected by the tourists but only up to a certain point. These effects are mainly as a result of the conflicts that arise between people. Also I found that many people are attracted to place, which have many facilities and as more and more people go to these places they become popular and become known as 'honey pot' sites. For Rutland water to ensure that one place doesn't become too crowded and overpopulated it makes sure there are quite a few 'honey pot' sites for people to visit. Even though there are many conflicts between the tourists and the environment Rutland water has managed them in various ways: * Having a cattle grid * Footpaths - tarmaced * Fencing * Small car parks * Putting up signs - control flow of tourists * Zoning certain areas By using these methods Rutland water has overcome most of its conflicts and is able to preserve the natural beauty of Rutland water and not damage or change the environment. Page 1 ...read more.

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