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We are trying to find out whether the heat of a solvent which copper sulphate is dissolved in, will effect the solubility of the sulphate in the solvent.

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Introduction

Guillaume Wright 9C2 C/W Science coursework- What effects the solubility 21/5/00 of Copper Sulphate ? (page 1) Aim: We are trying to find out whether the heat of a solvent which copper sulphate is dissolved in, will effect the solubility of the sulphate in the solvent. Prediction: I think that the warmer the solvent (tap water) is, the more copper sulphate will be dissolved. This is because when the water is warmed it gains more energy and the particles move further apart and there will be more space for the copper sulphate particles to dissolve in, allowing more copper sulphate particles to be dissolved before the tap water has been saturated. The particles will also dissolve quicker as the water particles will move around faster and will hit the copper sulphate particles more often and quicker allowing the sulphate particles to break away and dissolve quicker. Diagram: Plan: First I will measure out a certain amount of tap water (15ml ) into a beaker and measure its total weight in grams and then I will place the beaker onto a tripod and then I will take the temperature of the water up to 20 C by heating it with a Bunsen burner. I will then place three spatulas of copper sulphate, and wait for 5 minutes until no more will dissolve. ...read more.

Middle

I will also make sure that I clean up after my experiment afterwards. Method: First I measured out 15ml of water into a beaker and measured its total weight in grams. Then I placed the beaker onto a tripod and took the temperature of the water up to 20 C. I then placed 3 spatulas of copper sulphate into the water and left it for 5 minutes to dissolve. I then filtered the mixture to get rid of any undissolved solute and weighed the resulting solution. This told me how much copper sulphate was needed to saturate the water at this temperature. I then repeated the experiment but I also took the temperature of the water up 10 C every time up to 60 C. I also repeated the whole experiment again to get a more accurate average result for my graph. Results: Tables: 1st Experiment: Temperature Mass at Mass at Difference of water ( C) start (g) finish (g) (g) 20 C 63.89g 62.48g - 1.41g 30 C 63.89g 64.70g 0.81g 40 C 63.89g 62.92g - 0.97g 50 C 63.89g 63.96g 0.07g 60 C 63.89g 64.29g 0.40g 2nd Experiment: Temperature Mass at Mass at Difference of water ( C) start (g) finish (g) (g) 20 C 63.89g 62.78g - 1.11g 30 C 63.89g 64.95g 1.06g 40 C 63.89g 64.03g 0.14g 50 C 63.89g 63.93g 0.04g 60 C 63.89g 64.68g 0.79g Average: Temperature Mass at Mass at Difference of water ( C) ...read more.

Conclusion

This was because during the experiments we lost a certain amount of water which was either soaked up in the filter paper or had been soaked up in the small amount of undissolved copper sulphate. The other three results were fairly close to the line of best fit on the graph, but still they were slightly unusual due to the above reasons and inaccurate measuring. To improve our experiment we would need more time to do the various stages of our experiment to make them more accurate and to do them more carefully. We could have got more accurate measuring by using more solute and more solvent to get larger amounts of mass so that there is less room for error. If we had soaked the filter paper thoroughly before hand and also had more time to filter the mixture we could have got more accurate and sensible results because we would have retained all of our solvent that we had before filtration, after filtration. Another way of more accurate results would be to evaporate the resulting solvent after filtration leaving behind the true amount of dissolved copper sulphate to give a more accurate and true weight of copper sulphate. We could also have done more experiments at different temperatures so that we could have obtained more results and giving more results on the line of best fit to make it more accurate. ...read more.

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