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What factors affect the rate of reaction in an enzyme controlled reaction?

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Haley Griffiths What factors affect the rate of reaction in an enzyme controlled reaction? Planning Safety To ensure that the experiment is carried out in a safe manner, I must ensure that all the desktops and areas around the experiment are clear, with nothing on the floor so that no one can trip and fall. I must ensure that no hydrogen peroxide is spilt, and in the event of a spillage, I must inform a teacher and clear it up straight away. I must be careful with glassware, and if anything breaks, I must again inform a teacher and clear it away immediately. In this experiment I am going to see what affects the rate of reaction in an enzyme controlled reaction, and how. To do this I will add hydrogen peroxide to liquidised celery, which contains the enzyme catalase, and measure the reaction rate. The factors I could alter are * Temperature * The concentration of the enzyme * The concentration of the substrate * The surface area of the enzyme * pH In this experiment I have decided to alter the concentration of the enzyme. This is because the concentration of the enzyme is probably the easiest to measure, and therefore will hopefully be the most accurate. ...read more.

Middle

Celery Concentration (%) Amount of hydrogen peroxide (cm3) Volume of oxygen produced (cm3) 10 20 6 1.5 20 20 6 4.5 30 20 6 12.0 40 20 6 14.8 50 20 6 18.6 60 20 6 22.5 10 40 6 3.5 20 40 6 6.4 30 40 6 13.6 40 40 6 16.7 50 40 6 21.3 60 40 6 23.9 10 60 6 4.2 20 60 6 7.9 30 60 6 17.4 40 60 6 22.5 50 60 6 24.3 60 60 6 25.7 10 80 6 5.1 20 80 6 14.2 30 80 6 17.7 40 80 6 23.9 50 80 6 26.2 60 80 6 28.3 Third Repeat Time (seconds) Celery Concentration (%) Amount of hydrogen peroxide (cm3) Volume of oxygen produced (cm3) 10 20 6 1.4 20 20 6 2.5 30 20 6 7.3 40 20 6 9.3 50 20 6 11.2 60 20 6 17.3 10 40 6 0.0 20 40 6 3.2 30 40 6 7.9 40 40 6 11.2 50 40 6 13.6 60 40 6 19.5 10 60 6 2.6 20 60 6 4.3 30 60 6 9.9 40 60 6 13.4 50 60 6 15.2 60 60 6 18.4 10 80 6 3.2 20 80 6 5.9 30 80 6 11.4 40 80 6 15.8 50 80 6 21.3 60 80 6 24.7 Averages Time (seconds) ...read more.

Conclusion

There do not seem to be any anomalous results, except in the third repeat when I was using a concentration of forty percent celery. After ten seconds, I measured no oxygen whatsoever, and I presume this was due to a fault in the tubing; perhaps there were slight gaps that I had overlooked during that repeat. However, as this is the only time there is an anomaly within the results, I must assume that the rest of my results are accurate and reliable, and therefore the equipment was set up correctly and performed well. I think that my results are sufficiently reliable to support my conclusion (see above) because they match my prediction and scientific knowledge of this subject, and the figures I have obtained seem reasonable. I know they are accurate because I was careful to be accurate when taking readings from the gas syringe, and I am sure they are reliable because they do match scientific theory, as taken from text books, etc., and my prediction, which was made using scientific knowledge from various sources. To improve the reliability of the experiment, I think it would be necessary to find a way of feeding the celery into the conical flask, perhaps via another tube system, where it would be possible to add the celery to the hydrogen peroxide without losing any of the oxygen produced. 1 ...read more.

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