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Which equatoin is correct

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Introduction

To investigate the thermal decomposition of copper carbonate. Aim: The aim of this investigation is to examine the thermal decomposition of copper carbonate and to prove which of the following two equations is the correct thermal decomposition reaction: Equation 1: 2CuCO3 (s) ? Cu2O (s) + 2CO2 (g) + 1/2O2 (g) Equation 2: CuCO3 (s) ? CuO (s) + CO2 (g) Plan: The main aim of this investigation is to determine which of the two equations represent the correct thermal decomposition of copper carbonate. Copper carbonate has two oxides which are, Cu2O and CuO, due to this, two different equations can be written Equation 1: 2CuCO3 (s) ? Cu2O (s) + 2CO2 (g) + 1/2O2 (g) Equation 2: CuCO3 (s) ? CuO (s) + CO2 (g) To determine which of these two equations is correct I shall plan and design an appropriate experiment to measure the volume of gas that will prove which of the two equations is correct. Theory: Thermal decomposition is where one single compound breakdown into two or more simple compounds when heat is applied. Thermal decomposition is an endothermic reaction, this is when heat is taken in as the reactants change to products. The activation energy applied to the reactants is greater than the energy released during the change from reactants to products, thus the enthalpy change is positive. ...read more.

Middle

123.5 CuCO3 ? 24.0dm3 1 CuCO3 ? Volume of gas = Volume of gas = = 60 cm3 ? Using the same mass of CuCO3 volume of gas that would evolve by equation (2) = 60cm3. Prediction: I predict By carrying out the experiment and determining whether total volume of gas collected is 60cm3 or 75cm3 I can determine which of the two reactions equations is correct. The metal copper comes from the colorant family. Both equation (1) and (2) form a solid copper oxide, but have very different physical and chemical properties to one another. After decomposing the copper oxide formed in equation (1), ' Cu2O' has an assigned chemical name, cuprous oxide and is brick red in colour. However, the copper oxide formed in equation (2), 'CuO' is known as cupric oxide and is black in colour. Hence, I can further predict: If the solid copper oxide appears to be brick red in colour then equation (1) is correct. However, if the copper oxide is black in colour equation (2) is correct. Apparatus: To collect the gas I could either use a 100cm3 cylinder upside down in a water bath or 100cm3 gas syringe. The following two diagrams show the layout of the two apparatus: Fig 4 Fig 5 Measuring Cylinder Gas Syringe Carbon dioxide is heavy and soluble in water when under pressure this means that using a measuring cylinder upside down in a water bath will not give an accurate reading of CO2. ...read more.

Conclusion

* Let the gas within the gas syringe cool so as to get accurate measurement of gas as gas expands when heated and make sure volume of gas collected is approximately either 60cm3 or 75cm3. * Record results of experiment, this being colour of copper oxide and volume of gas collected. Safety Procedures: When handling with any chemicals or carrying experiment wear safety goggles and plastic gloves. All spillage should be cleaned up immediately. First Aid measures: Skin Contact = Any chemical which has come in contact with the skin, that area has to be washed immediately with large quantities of running water. If irritation continues seek medical attention. Eye Contact = For at least five minutes wash the eyes with water or a saline solution. If irritation continues seek medical attention. Ingestion = If chemical has been taken in the mouth, you must wash mouth with large amounts of water. If the chemical enters into the stomach, then give 250cm of water to dilute the chemical in the stomach. In more serious cases obtain medical attention. Reference: "Essential A2 Chemistry for OCR" By Ted Lister and Janet Renshaw 2004, Publisher: Nelson Thornes Pages: 86-87 "Essential AS Chemistry for OCR" By Ted Lister and Janet Renshaw 2004, Publisher: Nelson Thornes Pages: 26-27 "Chemistry 1 - Advanced Sciences" By Brian Ratcliff, Helen Eccles, David Johnson, John Nicholson, John Raffan 2000, Publisher: Cambridge Pages: 206, 179 http://physics.slss.ie/downloads/ph_sd_md_coppercarbonate.pdf Fig 1: http://www.bbc.co.uk/schools/gcsebitesize/chemistry/chemicalreactions/2energychangesrev3.shtml Fig 2: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Copper(I)_oxide Fig 3: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Copper(II)_oxide ...read more.

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