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Work related report

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Introduction The NHS is a massive organisation employing over 1.5 million employees. The NHS employs over 400, 000 nurses and without the NHS (National Health Service) would be nothing but fiction. Nurses play a big role inside the NHS. From all of the people providing a service in the NHS a nurse is the core of it all. A nurse will perform a range of tasks. Nurses will also work in different places and wards in a hospital. This is what I will discuss in my work related report moreover I will discuss the role of a nurse and many other topics regarding towards a nurse. What personal skills and qualities must a nurse have? Being a nurse is a big responsibility. You are only allowed to perform the job if you are 17 or over. There is a lot that is expected from a nurse. Stated below is what qualities and skills a nurse must have to go ahead with a nursing career. Nurses Specialise in: * Adult nursing * Children's Nursing * Mental health nursing * Learning disability nursing Required skills: Excellent people skills - Nurses will need to be able to provide care for people of all ages and backgrounds. They need to put people at ease and gain their confidence. They will also need to deal sympathetically with their own problems and fears because if they don't, they will not be able to do the job (stay unhappy and stressed all the time). Observation and communication - communication and observation skills are crucial element that will lead to a good nursing career. Listening and talking skills need to be of upmost importance. If a nurse is not talking clearly then the patient may fail to understand what the nurse is trying to say. If a nurse does not listen to what the patient says about his/her illness then the nurse will not know what problem or condition to diagnose. This is why a nurse must have good listening skills. ...read more.


I felt fine about doing this, but I did not realise that there would be at least ten relatives following me down to the mortuary. Unfortunately, I was only vaguely aware of where it was. Trying to make conversation on this long walk was very awkward. Nursing students lived in the hospital in those days. The cheap accommodation was like something out of Prisoner Cell Block H, with a small room, few home comforts and shared wash blocks down the corridor. As we knew no different, it was fine. Later in my training I decided to move to a flat, still within the hospital grounds. This seemed like pure luxury- I had my own room with a sink and only had to share a bathroom and kitchen with three other people. First patients I still remember the first patients I nursed all those years ago and wonder what became of them. On my first medical ward there was a woman in her forties who was hospitalised for a long time as she had MS and pressure sores. It took ages for her to trust the nurses and form a relationship with them, but this was achieved through good nursing care and a great deal of humour. I remember feeling so strong after managing to put a patient in a bath single-handedly, using an ambichair. I am short and, compared to me, the patient was a giant. This would not happen now, of course, for health and safety reasons. I particularly enjoyed building up a rapport with older patients - the geriatric ward was a hoot. Although the work was hard, there seemed more time to spend with patients. At change-over There was a greater overlap of staff, so the sisters had time to go to meetings and things that had not been done in the morning could be finished. The tutors actually came to work on the wards with the nurses and assessed their competence for specific tasks, such as aseptic technique. ...read more.


Whilst I waited 3 hours for the operation to take place, I gave a questionnaire to one of the nurses. She said she'd complete it before I leave the hospital. This is the Questionnaire: Q1. What's a typical workday like for you? "I have three to five patients per day. I review my assignments and patient information, medications and needs, discuss them with the previous shift, and then meet my patients. I do a full assessment, including heart, lungs, surgical site, pain levels and IV fluids, then deal with patient issues such as low blood pressure, oxygenation and temperature. I chart my findings, review lab work, patient history and doctors' orders, and consider which complications may arise. I also administer IV and oral medication, change dressings, care for surgical pins, and take care of individual needs such as tube feeding, diabetes care and education. At the end of my shift, I report to the nurses and nursing assistants who are coming in". Q2. How does your role fit into the bigger healthcare picture?"The RN's role is huge. We advocate for and mediate between patients and physicians. We also get social services involved to work with insurance companies and we give the patient the care that they deserve". Q3. Who do you cooperate with during the course of the day?" I cooperate with patients and their families, other nurses, nursing assistants, unit secretary, doctors, nurse practitioners, physician assistants, laboratory, radiology, spiritual care and healing healthcare staff, and social workers. Q4. Why did you become a registered nurse?" I had a family member in the hospital and the nurses treated her so well that I wanted to be in that role for other people's families". Q5. What do you like about your work?"I love my work. I love taking care of patients, advocating for them, seeing them get better and walk out the door feeling better than when they came in. I love being there for their families. I like the staff, the facility - I like everything about my job". ...read more.

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