• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month
Page
  1. 1
    1
  2. 2
    2
  3. 3
    3
  4. 4
    4
  5. 5
    5
  6. 6
    6
  7. 7
    7
  8. 8
    8
  9. 9
    9
  10. 10
    10
  11. 11
    11
  12. 12
    12
  13. 13
    13
  14. 14
    14
  15. 15
    15
  16. 16
    16
  17. 17
    17

Work related report

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Introduction The NHS is a massive organisation employing over 1.5 million employees. The NHS employs over 400, 000 nurses and without the NHS (National Health Service) would be nothing but fiction. Nurses play a big role inside the NHS. From all of the people providing a service in the NHS a nurse is the core of it all. A nurse will perform a range of tasks. Nurses will also work in different places and wards in a hospital. This is what I will discuss in my work related report moreover I will discuss the role of a nurse and many other topics regarding towards a nurse. What personal skills and qualities must a nurse have? Being a nurse is a big responsibility. You are only allowed to perform the job if you are 17 or over. There is a lot that is expected from a nurse. Stated below is what qualities and skills a nurse must have to go ahead with a nursing career. Nurses Specialise in: * Adult nursing * Children's Nursing * Mental health nursing * Learning disability nursing Required skills: Excellent people skills - Nurses will need to be able to provide care for people of all ages and backgrounds. They need to put people at ease and gain their confidence. They will also need to deal sympathetically with their own problems and fears because if they don't, they will not be able to do the job (stay unhappy and stressed all the time). Observation and communication - communication and observation skills are crucial element that will lead to a good nursing career. Listening and talking skills need to be of upmost importance. If a nurse is not talking clearly then the patient may fail to understand what the nurse is trying to say. If a nurse does not listen to what the patient says about his/her illness then the nurse will not know what problem or condition to diagnose. This is why a nurse must have good listening skills. ...read more.

Middle

I felt fine about doing this, but I did not realise that there would be at least ten relatives following me down to the mortuary. Unfortunately, I was only vaguely aware of where it was. Trying to make conversation on this long walk was very awkward. Nursing students lived in the hospital in those days. The cheap accommodation was like something out of Prisoner Cell Block H, with a small room, few home comforts and shared wash blocks down the corridor. As we knew no different, it was fine. Later in my training I decided to move to a flat, still within the hospital grounds. This seemed like pure luxury- I had my own room with a sink and only had to share a bathroom and kitchen with three other people. First patients I still remember the first patients I nursed all those years ago and wonder what became of them. On my first medical ward there was a woman in her forties who was hospitalised for a long time as she had MS and pressure sores. It took ages for her to trust the nurses and form a relationship with them, but this was achieved through good nursing care and a great deal of humour. I remember feeling so strong after managing to put a patient in a bath single-handedly, using an ambichair. I am short and, compared to me, the patient was a giant. This would not happen now, of course, for health and safety reasons. I particularly enjoyed building up a rapport with older patients - the geriatric ward was a hoot. Although the work was hard, there seemed more time to spend with patients. At change-over There was a greater overlap of staff, so the sisters had time to go to meetings and things that had not been done in the morning could be finished. The tutors actually came to work on the wards with the nurses and assessed their competence for specific tasks, such as aseptic technique. ...read more.

Conclusion

Whilst I waited 3 hours for the operation to take place, I gave a questionnaire to one of the nurses. She said she'd complete it before I leave the hospital. This is the Questionnaire: Q1. What's a typical workday like for you? "I have three to five patients per day. I review my assignments and patient information, medications and needs, discuss them with the previous shift, and then meet my patients. I do a full assessment, including heart, lungs, surgical site, pain levels and IV fluids, then deal with patient issues such as low blood pressure, oxygenation and temperature. I chart my findings, review lab work, patient history and doctors' orders, and consider which complications may arise. I also administer IV and oral medication, change dressings, care for surgical pins, and take care of individual needs such as tube feeding, diabetes care and education. At the end of my shift, I report to the nurses and nursing assistants who are coming in". Q2. How does your role fit into the bigger healthcare picture?"The RN's role is huge. We advocate for and mediate between patients and physicians. We also get social services involved to work with insurance companies and we give the patient the care that they deserve". Q3. Who do you cooperate with during the course of the day?" I cooperate with patients and their families, other nurses, nursing assistants, unit secretary, doctors, nurse practitioners, physician assistants, laboratory, radiology, spiritual care and healing healthcare staff, and social workers. Q4. Why did you become a registered nurse?" I had a family member in the hospital and the nurses treated her so well that I wanted to be in that role for other people's families". Q5. What do you like about your work?"I love my work. I love taking care of patients, advocating for them, seeing them get better and walk out the door feeling better than when they came in. I love being there for their families. I like the staff, the facility - I like everything about my job". ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE Humans as Organisms section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE Humans as Organisms essays

  1. Marked by a teacher

    Should the MMR vaccination be made compulsory in the UK?

    5 star(s)

    instead of two triple vaccinations. This is bound to cause more missed appointments and lead to reduced protection against disease. * Not taking up rubella vaccination - parents may opt not to vaccinate their children, particularly their sons, against rubella as they feel that they are at less risk from it.

  2. Stem Cell Research

    Stem cells, that are stimulated to differentiate into specific cells, offer a renewable source of replacement cells, tissues and organs to treat numerous diseases and injuries.12 These include Alzheimer's disease, stroke, heart disease, diabetes, osteoarthritis, burns and even spinal cord injuries.12 All of these diseases and injuries involve the damage of or loss of vital cells and tissues.

  1. Human biology short notes

    beating movements of cilia push the dust particles to the top of trachea (epiglottis) Effect of smoking on the lungs Action of cilia * Nicotine paralyses cilia * Cilia no-longer beat * Pathogens not removed from the blood * Leads to infection of the respiratory surface Mucus Production * Since

  2. Diabetes Type 1 and 2

    Method 1. Put 3ml depth of urine A into a test tube. 2. Dip the bit on the end of a clinistix into the urine, then wait for one minute and then compare it with the colour chart. If glucose is present it will turn purple.

  1. Should the cloning of humans be allowed?

    The ammonia damaged the cornea (the clear membrane which covers the front of the eye) with severe scarring which resulted in stem cells which kept the cornea healthy being destroyed. Doctors from the North East England Stem Cell Institute in Newcastle took stem cells from Turnbull's healthy eye and grew

  2. Reflective Profile - The Practice of Midwifery

    Having been in the position of expectant mother herself in the past Emma could relate that if the fetal heart was audible this did in fact placate any fears or worries one might have. The midwife was in a difficult position because she would be torn between following suggested guidelines

  1. Exercise has certain benefits on a person's health, and physical condition.

    Type 2 occurs in 90 percent to 95 percent of diabetics and usually occurs in adults over the age of 40, most often between the ages of 50 and 60. Type 2 diabetics have an abnormal glucose-tolerance test and higher than normal levels of insulin in their blood.

  2. The aim of my investigation is to measure the effects of BMI (body mass ...

    The smooth muscle and elastic fibres that make up their walls enable them to withstand the high pressure of blood as it is pumped from the heart. The force that blood exerts on the walls of blood vessels is known as blood pressure and it cycles with each heart-beat.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work