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Are Conjugal roles still in the twenty first century, separated by gender"

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Introduction

"Are Conjugal roles still in the twenty first century, separated by gender" Hypothesis/Aim - 87 words My investigation will be based on family relationships; more specifically why conjugal roles in the twenty first century are most frequently governed by gender. I have been raised in a society, where the majority of domestic tasks, are automatically assumed to be 'women's work'. Families are changing - single parents, reconstituted families and homosexual relationships. Man is no longer the breadwinner; sex discrimination in working environments is unlawful. Even so, dust on the computer will wait for a 'woman's touch'. I aim to find out why this is. Context and Concepts - 402 words My first concept is conjugal roles; Young and Willmott (1973) claimed the roles of husband and wife were becoming increasingly similar. In 1974, Anne Oakley argued there was still a clear division along gender lines. Young and Willmott's research announced the arrival of the "Symmetrical Family" where roles of husband and wife are similar. They based their research on historical evidence, plus work from earlier studies. Family life was changing; roles in society were altering, particularly in the home. ...read more.

Middle

In his estimation it may take a generation or more before men 'catch up' and make an equal contribution. Methodology - 410 words For my study, into 'conjugal roles in the 21st century' I would carry out my research in the form of an interview. This is when a series of questions are asked directly by the researcher to the respondent. However, an interview can also be conducted as a discussion. Sociologists generally use interviews if the subject of enquiry is 'complex'. The type of interview I would use would be unstructured, this will enable the researcher to only have a central area for discussion, this being 'conjugal roles', allowing applicable questions to be added if necessary. The interview would be transcribed (recorded on tape) as not to disturb the flow of the interview. Choosing my participants, I would use 'systematic sampling'. This is when participants are chosen, on the basis, of for example them being the every third couple on a list. By doing this, I wouldn't be choosing them myself and I couldn't be classed as being biased, for choosing one couple, over another. ...read more.

Conclusion

Equally these points can cause researcher's evidence to be invalid. Unstructured interviews such as mine, are generally recorded and transcribed, this in total needs a substantial amount of time. Sociologists, Tizard & Hughes (1991) recorded interviews with pupils, to explore their learning methods. For each hour of tape, this took 17hours to transcribe and verify. But in addition writing down replies, whilst interviewing participants can disturb the flow of the interview. The aim of the research process is to gain sufficient interviews for the investigator to be able to make an accurate generalization. Conversely, if interviews are in fact different from each other as a consequence of the interaction, then it is incorrect to make generalizations. Both questionnaires and interviews share the problem of the values of the researcher, adding his/her questions. The two important problems used here is using leading questions and using loaded words. Leading questions are when a researcher can influence the answer of the participant in the way the question is asked. For example the question "Wouldn't you agree that..." is worded to sound like the right answer. Loaded words and phrases, used when researchers use particular forms of language that either indicate a viewpoint, or will generate a particular positive or negative response, e.g. life (positive) & death (negative). ...read more.

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