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Charles Booth Biography 1840 - Born he was the son of a wealthy Liverpool entrepreneur.1884 - Made a Fellow of the Royal Statistical Society

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Introduction

Charles Booth Biography 1840 - Born he was the son of a wealthy Liverpool entrepreneur. 1884 - Made a Fellow of the Royal Statistical Society 1885 - After involvement with the Mansion House Enquiry into unemployment, decided to investigate poverty in London, with a small team of investigators. 1894 - Published survey 'The Aged Poor in England and Wales'. 1903 - 17 volumes of the inquiry into 'The Life and Labour of the People of London' completed. What did he set out to do? > He rejected the hard line of the Charity Organisation Society (COS) that poverty was the fault of the poor. He did not blame the capitalist system for creating poverty either. ...read more.

Middle

> Examples server to show how intermeshed and yet wide-ranging Booth's investigators and investigations became. > Jesse Argyle started out as one of Booth's company clerks. He was an able and perceptive interviewer, responsible for investigating poverty in Walthamstow and wrote up his findings for the final publication. > Graham Balfour fellow of the Royal Statistical Society, he set up the enquiry into poverty in Battersea, supervised it and wrote up for the publication. > Octavia Hill made contributions on model dwellings and their influence on the character of the poor. What did he discover? > Booth and his team divided the population into classes. He believed that an appreciation of the differences between the classes was fundamental to understanding the causes of poverty. ...read more.

Conclusion

Class E earned up to 30 shillings a week and Class F were the best paid skilled artisans. They were the lower and upper middle classes What solutions did he propose? > Booth saw Classes A and B as the biggest problems. Class A could be dealt with through established charities and individual acts of philanthropy, coupled with rigorous policing. > His solution to the problem caused by Class B was to take them out of the labour market altogether. He saw them as lacking the ability to better themselves and because of this dragging down classes C and D. He was opening up employment opportunities for classes C and D who were better able to manage themselves. > In this way, they would rise out of poverty and the poor, while remaining poor, would be able to live above his 'poverty line'. ...read more.

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