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Do you get it? If not youll want to - Salvador Dali.

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Do you "get it?" If not you'll want to. Lindsey Gallagher Writing 205 Arielle .... Final Paper Salvador Dali's creativity allowed him the freedom to be who he wanted to be, the same is true in American culture today. Dali's excellence in draftsmanship, accessibility of imagery from the unconscious, and master of self-publicity all resulted in unimaginable fame. Dali was born in Figueras, a northern Spanish province of Catalonia in May of 1904; Dali began his life within a middle-class family. He joined the Surrealist movement during the summer of 1929, however with much reserve because he shared little of their political and religious affiliations of atheism and Marxism politics, in addition to ties with the Communist Party. He remained true to his beliefs was expelled from the group and ended up in American years later, where he made a home with his wife Gala. As he arrived in the United States, the shift in attitudes and values were just starting to stir. More immigration was taking place and new ideas and outlooks on the world were circulating around in a buzz. He was part of this new creative lifestyle. Working when he wanted, setting his own prices, and ultimately having more freedom because the economic and social structures were changing. The economic structures refer to big business and how the job market is related to people, and the social structures are broad attitudes and valued by people in the market and in society as a whole. This is all because of this new rise in the "creative class." The "creative class" consists of scientists, engineers, artists, musicians, and knowledge-based professionals. Since 1900 this class, once only holding 10% of workers has grown to obtaining 30%, and is continually growing. Salvador Dali is the icon of Surrealism because of his ability to depict the unconscious, his crazy appearance, and his self-publicity methods, while Dali never conformed to the ideologies of the Surrealist though, he did use Surrealism as a stepping-stone to advance into ...read more.

Middle

The "creative class," was first named by Richard Florida. Although Dali didn't realize at the time, he had moved from growing up in a middle-class environment to Paris with the Surrealists where he found "valuable contacts, a public forum, and the most stimulating intellectual and artistic environment," yet this was only a spring board for him because he never really settled there. From here he transformed greatly with influence from Raphael and others, eventually landing him in the United States, where the birth of this new class was just barely becoming evident (Andes 78). This is a path many more would take after him, to become part of the revolution in America. The creative class is a phenomenon that defines how Americans today are beginning to live their lives as artists and scientist have been doing for years. As a direct result from the change in life of approximately 30% of American, our values tastes, relationships, geographic locations, as well as sense and use of time have all changed. So in some respects when Dali arrived in America, maybe not as a direct influence from Dali, but about 20% more of the population than usual began to follow his way of life as an artist. This led American society down a road of change. Social attitudes have been transformed as well as economic norms. The creative class, is actually a welding together of proletariat ethics, and bohemian values. These molded together yield the creative ethos. The Surrealists emerged during a time of war between two classes; the bourgeois and the proletariat. In Karl Marx, the philosopher, whose work much of Surrealist thought was based on, made the point in his seminal analysis that the tension between these two classes was the "mainspring driving the course of modern history and shaping modern society-and the tension was over entirely economic matters" (Florida, 193). However Marx's work was criticized for his lack of cultural aspects of this struggle between the classes. ...read more.

Conclusion

There were obvious distinctions between white and blue collar workers. People treated people differently based on their dress, this is common still today, however one should remain cautious that in today's society, with the increasing presence of this new class, it is possible to walk by a twenty year old in baggy jeans with tattoos and piercing whom has also just founded his own music production company. He may be an artist who sells one painting for more than a doctor can make in month. This "no-collar workplace" has stuck because it attracts more creative people who will not settle for a job which requires them to decrease their individuality, a main value, to keep a job. Holding a job in the working, or service class means that you have to hold certain hours which are convenient for those you work for and those you serve. With the creative class, it is a bit different. The creative class rarely has set hours, yet it is interesting that Florida's research has shown that they actually work longer hours then any other class. Possibly because they love what the do, they become their work, as Dali did. Art is not just a job, and a way to make money, it is a part of you, deeper than anything you can learn. It is individual, and meaningful, and the creative class while taking pride in what they invent, construct or produce, is a reflection of themselves, being the reason their work hours extend longer than say a factory workers do. But the amount of time they spend in the office, or in a cubicle, is minute. They work at home, in their spare time, and when it is convenient for them. They work when they feel creative, when they get a new idea. Creativity is based on sporadic moments when the something clicks in the brain, the light bulb over the head idea. Companies who need the creative aspect can not require people to be creative during 9am and 5pm, and companies know this. ...read more.

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