• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

Examine the pattern of, and reasons for, domestic violence in society.

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Examine the pattern of, and reasons for, domestic violence in society. The Women's Aid federation defines domestic violence as the physical, psychological, sexual or financial violence that takes place within a family type or an intimate relationship, and forms a pattern of coercive and controlling behaviour. It may involve partners ex-partners holds hold members or other relatives. Though the more common view of domestic violence is that it is the behaviour of some disturbed 'sick' individuals. However sociologists have questioned this, saying that it's far too widespread to be the work of just a few individuals. Domestic violence accounts for almost a quarter of all violent crimes and is estimated that 6.6 million domestic assaults occur every year. Domestic Violence follows certain social patterns and these patterns have social causes. Most shocking of these patterns is that it is mainly violence by men against women. Catriona Mirrlees-Blacks survey in 1999 found that most victims of violent domestic crimes are women, 99% of all incidents against women are committed by men, nearly 1 in 4 women have been assaulted by a partner at some in her life and 1 in 8 have been repeatedly assaulted. ...read more.

Middle

Radical Feminists believe that all societies have been founded in patriarchy and that the key division in society is not between social classes but between men and women. Radical Feminists see men as the enemy, the source of women's oppression and exploitation and they see the family and marriage as the key institutions in patriarchal society, to them its all very one sided, men benefit from women's unpaid domestic labour and they dominate women through violence and threat of it, women gain nothing from the relationship. For Radical feminists the patriarchal system must be overturned especially the root of women's oppression, which are men and the family. However Marxist feminists unlike radical feminists ague that the main cause of women's oppression in the family is not due to men but due to capitalism. They see capitalist society as divided into two different social classes: The capitalist class, they own the means of production and the working class, who have only there labour to sell and the capitalists exploit it for profit. ...read more.

Conclusion

The its seems as though the Marxist feminists believe that what oppresses women in the family isn't men but is capitalism and that the family structure should be abolished. Dobash and Dobash like Radical feminists have a gender related oppression and say that the reason many women tend to be the receivers of domestic violence is because men feel that women sometimes challenge there authority. Men all through history have been socialised into believing that they have power over women and that they have to provide for the family. This maybe one of the main reasons for why domestic violence exists and why its mainly women being the victims. Wilkinson's theory seems to be quite well though out and has a good idea of why domestic violence actually occurs, though if this is true then why are women mainly the victims? Liberal feminists hope and believe that over time the problems that we suffer today will just sort them-selves out, but will this really happen. If we just leave the problems the way they are will they actually just disappear, or will the problem become worse? Sociology Lizzy Franks ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE Sociology section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE Sociology essays

  1. is domestic violence a purely private problem or a national social problem? Discuss

    It will consider the Feminist perspective on the issue and the key thinkers behind the women's movement in the aim of emphasizing the very public nature of this private problem. Lockton and Ward (1997:3) comment that up until the nineteenth century it was lawful for a husband to chastise his wife, as he would his children and servants.

  2. The Objectives of Dobash and Dobash's work was to explain and describe domestic violence ...

    Obviously they didn't want the women to feel more vulnerable and distressed then they already were. Although reliability is not a high priority in the choice of method, Dobash and Dobash did have a certain degree of structure within the indepth methods that they used.

  1. Pakistani Women In a Changing Society.

    This is a type of evidence that is most unlikely to be found except perhaps in the vast open spaces of the Arabian desert. In effect, therefore, the offence of rape is unprovable and rapists now go about without fear.

  2. Critically Examine The Main Theory Of Power

    The 'New Labour' government of Tony Blair can be seen as balancing business interests (e.g. by allowing private involvement in public services) and worker/union interests (e.g. by introducing minimum wage legislation). There have been many criticisms of classical pluralism: 1.

  1. Is domestic violence a purely private problem or a national social problem?

    It will consider the Feminist perspective on the issue and the key thinkers behind the women's movement in the aim of emphasizing the very public nature of this private problem. Lockton and Ward (1997:3) comment that up until the nineteenth century it was lawful for a husband to chastise his wife, as he would his children and servants.

  2. Pitted against Patriarchy

    Janet McNeill powerfully conveys the sense of complacency and unease which penetrates middle-class Protestant Belfast. The Maiden Dinosaur charts the progress of a large, plain, intelligent Presbyterian school mistress. Sarah Vincent, who at the age of fifty-two, like Judith Hearne, attempts to make sense of and face up to her own loneliness and isolation.

  1. Using poverty and domestic violence as examples, critically investigate the different roles that 'the ...

    Within psychodynamic theory it is generally believed that violent men have childhoods characterized by rejection and insecurity (Dobash and Dobash, 1992). According to Dinnerstein (1976) such insecurity stems from the deprivation of basic needs, such as dependency and attachment, and the mother, as primary caretaker, is often feared for her power to either provide or withhold these.

  2. James Gilligan's Thesis on Violence

    James Gilligan, in an insightful study of violence among men, theorizes a cycle of poverty, shame, violence and punishment that is continually perpetuated in modern American society, aided in no small part by our penal system. His book Violence: Our Deadly Epidemic and its Causes delves into the nature

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work