• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

Explain how the hidden curriculum and processes within schools help to produce inequalities between children of different social classes.

Extracts from this document...


Explain how the hidden curriculum and processes within schools help to produce inequalities between children of different social classes. Through many different researches, it has been shown that working class students are underachieving compared to that of their middle class peers. Middle class pupils are obtaining better grades, and more of them are staying on in education past the compulsory age. The difference that is noticeable is that they are from different social class backgrounds, and therefore they are socialised differently. In order to find out more about this, we need to discuss the reasons for differences between the ways in which the different social classes are taught in schools. The hidden curriculum could be defined as the values that are taught through the attitudes and ideas of the teachers and other students. Often, teachers have a subconscious concept about children from different social backgrounds. This can affect the ways in which the pupils are taught, and their thoughts and motivations about schooling. ...read more.


Teachers are more likely to have a better attitude to parents of middle class than working class, and this may be putting the parents off visiting the school and paying attention to their child's education. Many schools have a system where classes are divided into different ability groups. This is known as 'streaming.' Peter Woods is a sociologist, whose research found that, in general, middle class students were placed in higher ability groups, and working class students were in lower groups. Most teachers admitted to having a preference of teaching the higher sets, because the students were better behaved. When educating the lower groups, the teacher often spent more time controlling behaviour, rather than teaching. The lower groups often had an anti-school subculture, in which breaking school rules was regarded as 'cool' by some students. Due to this anti-school subculture and poor behaviour of the lower ability students, the teachers often expected less from them. This led to the students being deprived of higher knowledge and skills that would help them to achieve better grades. ...read more.


Also, middle class jobs have regular training sessions, where new skills are frequently taught. On the other hand, working class jobs have no promotions or advancements. Working class children are brought up to be aware of this difference. This leads to them aspiring for different things. They will look for immediate gratification after compulsory education, as they feel that there is no need to stay on. There is no point in staying on if the jobs they will acquire don't involve any upgrades. There are many reasons for the difference in educational attainment between middle class and working class students. The hidden curriculum and other processes within schools do contribute to this. In particular, teachers' attitudes and the system of streaming are probably the main school points that significantly make a difference in social class education. However, it is unfair to just limit the reasons to school factors. To make a reasonable conclusion, other factors need to be considered. Some examples are home and living conditions, and the cultures that the student is brought up with. These other aspects also play a part in the difference between the two social classes, and their education. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE Sociology section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE Sociology essays

  1. Explain How the Hidden Curriculum and Processes Within Schools Help to Produce Inequalities Between ...

    Middle class parents encouraged their children to work hard and stay on at Post-16. They taught their children things from a very young age, and this included reading and speaking, as well as childhood games and table manners. However, it is suggested that there are reasons why working class parents seem less interested in their children's education.

  2. The essay will begin by looking at what normality and social construction is and ...

    school management were either unwilling or unable to do anything about it". Within this comprehensive were children with disabilities. Bradley says he had no warning and no guidance on how to address their needs, he describes the experience a disaster and was shocked by the way the disabled children were bullied by the others in the group.

  1. Determining the Elite within Politics and the Judiciary.

    (Stanworth 1984 p276) This culture clearly manifested itself in many of the common assumptions shared by the political elite. For example, confidentiality was stressed as essential to good government and expressed in doctrines like 'collective ministerial responsibility'. This obliged all ministers to defend government policy and conceal from the public the debates and divisions occurring inside government.

  2. The Hidden Curriculum; Hegemony and Capitalism.

    level of a mini society, making students accustomed to the regulations, social values and norms of the broader society. As it is stated by the Oxford Dictionary of Sociology, the hidden curriculum, "refers to the way in which cultural values and attitudes (such as obedience to authority, punctuality, and delayed gratification)

  1. What effects did World War One have on social classes?

    Instantly economic pressure came from the lack of trade with those who were now the enemy, and the source of some raw materials and was lost. Production was switched to the war effort, and shortages resulted in a different economic direction, all of which had a varying effect on the social structures of the countries involved.

  2. Statistics reveal that there is a stark difference between the attainment of working class ...

    Giroux claims that children are actively involved in shaping their own education. They draw upon their own cultures in ways to respond to schooling. Different classes try to influence the content and the processes of schooling. The nature of education is influenced by a continuing struggle between the social classes involved.

  1. In this section I will be comparing between the working class and the middle ...

    In his garden he was able to grow flowers and shrubs. The sanitation of the houses was different. The widow's toilet was an ash pit privy outside. For toilet paper they used newspaper cut into squares.

  2. Gender difference

    These methods will involve submitting the questionnaires to random people from within the sample frame. For example, random teachers for the questionnaire intended for teachers, balancing the gender proportion via 10 female and 10 male teachers. However, the student questionnaire sampling process is slightly more stratified.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work