• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month
Page
  1. 1
    1
  2. 2
    2
  3. 3
    3
  4. 4
    4
  5. 5
    5
  6. 6
    6
  7. 7
    7
  8. 8
    8
  9. 9
    9
  10. 10
    10

Gandhi's Impact on the Liberation of Indian Women.

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Gandhi's Impact on the Liberation of Indian Women India has the world's largest number of professionally qualified women. It has more female doctors, surgeons, scientists and professors than the United Statesi. This is a remarkable accomplishment for Indian women. Despite all of this, for thousands of years Indian women have been treated unfairly and unequally. It has taken years for women to gain respect in society; it did not come over night. Not one single event has emancipated women, instead it has been a series of events which has led Indian women to their liberation. Many riots, protests and powerful leadership have taken place in order to overcome this rigorous struggle. Due to the leadership of one man India changed from being controlled by the British Commonwealth to becoming and Independent Nation. This leader was Mahatma Gandhi. In is efforts to develop an independent country he also paved the path for Indian women to rise and speak against the social norms, which excluded them in society. During the time of Gandhi's leadership he observed many instances in which women were suffering. For instance, the average life span of an Indian was 27 years as both babies and pregnant women ran a high risk of dying young. Child marriages were very common, widows were in high numbers, and only 2% of the women had any education. In addition, specifically in North India the women practiced the purda (veil) system, in which they had to keep their faces covered if they were to go outside. ...read more.

Middle

Truth (Satya) implies love, and firmness (Agraha) engenders and therefore serve's as a synonym for force. Gandhi adopted what he learned in South Africa and demonstrated his political genius for the Independence struggle of India. Under his guidance a mass movement was created and eventually through his patience and his use of Satyagraha, Independence was declared in 1949. Gandhi seemed to direct an appeal specifically to women, telling them he had great faith in their capacity to sacrifice and endure suffering. This was a concept that women could easily comprehend since they have socialized to endure and sacrifice. Mahatma Gandhi speaks of this and explains why women are more able to self-sacrifice, "Woman is the incarnation of Ahimsa. Ahimsa means infinite love which again means infinite capacity in the largest measure. She shows it as she carries the infant and feeds it during nine months and derives joy in the suffering involved. What can beat the sufferings caused by the pangs of labour? But she forgets them in the joy of creation. Who, again, suffers daily so that her babe may wax from today? Let her transfer that love the whole humanity, let her forget she ever was or can be object of man's lust. And she will occupy her proud position by the side of man as his mother, maker and silent leader. It is given to her to teach the art of peace to the warring world, thirsting for that nectar. She can become the leader of Satyagraha which does not require the learning that books give but does require the stout heart that comes from suffering and faith" xiv. ...read more.

Conclusion

Reference Notes i www.indiaonestop.com ii Aloo J. Dastur and Usha H.Hehta, Gandhi's contribution to the Emancipation of Women (Printed in New Delhi, 1991) 25. iii Kapadia, www.mkgandhi.org iv Kamaladevi Chattopadhayhay, Indian Women's Battle For Freedom (Delhi: Abhinav, 1983) 114. v Mahatma Gandhi, Women (Ahmedabad: Navajivan, 1958) 24. vi Mahatma Gandhi, Women (Amedebad; Navajivan, 1958) 25. vii Mahatma Gandhi, Women (Ahmedebad; Navajivan 1958) 27. viii Aloo J.Dastur and Usha H. Mehta, Gandhi's Contribution to the Emancipation of Women, (Printed in New Delhi, 1991) 23. ix Pushpa Joshi, Gandhi On Women (Ahmedabad; Najivan, 1988) 14. x Pushpa Joshi, Gandhi On Women (Ahmedabad; Najivan, 1988) 14. xi Mahatma Gandhi, Women and Social Injustice (Ahmedad; Navijivan, 1958) 6. xii Mahatma Gandhi, Women and Social Injustice (Ahmedad; Navijivan, 1958) 12. xiii Paulson S. Lebra and J. Everett, Women and Work in India (New Delhi; Promilla, 1984) 110. xiv Gandhi, www.mkgandhi.org. xv Pushpa Joshi, Gandhi On Women (Ahmedabad; Najivan, 1988) iii. xvi Kamaladevi Chattopadhayhay, Indian Women's Battle For Freedom (Delhi: Abhinav, 1983) 107. xvii Aloo J. Dastur and Usha H.Hehta, Gandhi's contribution to the Emancipation of Women (Printed in New Delhi, 1991) 6. xviii Pushpa Joshi, Gandhi On Women (Ahmedabad; Najivan, 1988) 38. xix Sunil Sen, The Working Women and Popular Movements in Bengal, (Calcutta, 1985) 24. xx Sunil Sen, The Working Women and Popular Movements in Bengal, (Calcutta, 1985) 25. xxi Kaur, Women in India's Freedom Struggle (New Delhi; Sterling, 1985) 161. xxii Mary Fainsod Katzenstein, "Organizing Against Violence: Stragedies of the Indian Women's Movement", Pacific Affairs 62:1 (Spring, 1989), 53-71. xxiii Kamaladevi Chattopadhayhay, Indian Women's Battle For Freedom (Delhi: Abhinav, 1983) 108. xxiv Kamaladevi Chattopadhayhay, Indian Women's Battle For Freedom (Delhi: Abhinav, 1983) 109. xxv www.indiaonestop.com 1 ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE Sociology section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE Sociology essays

  1. sociology research hypothesis - Attitudes towards Arranged and Love marriages In ...

    that I would not get suitable answers as they were too young to think this ahead of their future. I have proved all three of my hypotheses correct by giving out this questionnaire. The answers that people have given me have helped me a lot with my research of proving my hypotheses correct.

  2. The Hindu Woman: Life under the Laws of Manu

    It was banned in 1829 under the Prevention of Sati Act (Subbama, 1992:179). Stagnant in a Changing World Although the Indian Constitution, passed in 1950, guaranteed women complete equality with men, in the social sphere the rights of women have generally remained unchanged.

  1. Arranged Marriages in the Sikh Diaspora

    When he asked his parents why it was so important that he marry another Jat, they simply said that that was the way their family always did things, i.e., it's part of their traditional heritage. What may seem perfectly natural to parents often seems confusing to children who have not grown up with a strong sense of family tradition.

  2. Sexism is a form of prejudice.

    The science subject biology had the most grades achieved by girls who got 9.0% where boys only got 7.3%. Boys achieved the most A-C2 grades in chemistry at 9.4% where girls only achieved 7.4% of the graded. Physics, another science subject with the most grades achieved by boys at 10.8% and girls only got 5.7% of these grades.

  1. 1920's America - In what ways was this an age of liberation for women?

    For the first time, women were being allowed to participate in higher education, and therefore qualify for higher professions like a medical career. Previous to and during this, large numbers of women worked long hours in "sweatshop" conditions for very low wages.

  2. Why did Plato think women could be legitimate political guardians?

    Women to the Ancient world were seen as the 'weaker sex'. However Plato does agree on this point, and there is truth in the matter, women are generally weaker then men, though some women may be stronger then a weak man, but he still believed that they could still do

  1. Yoga is a living tradition, an ancient Indian physical and mental system for self ...

    My yoga class usually begins with a set of gentle warmup stretches, followed by a series of inversions and forward and back bending poses. It is then followed by a set of aggressive breathing techniques which are considered useful for purifying lungs.

  2. The ancient civilizations of Central and South America

    There were a total of 365 days in their solar calendar. Another calendar was their ritual calendar. It consisted of 260 days, and had 20 day names. These day names were accompanied by the numbers 1-13. For example if someone was born on the 10th day of Rabbit (a day name)

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work