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In "Cat On a Hot Tin Roof", by Tennessee Williams, there are a number of rather disturbing themes that reflect on our modern society.

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Introduction

Eduardo Moura English Ms. Solowey 2/22/03 Conflicts in "Cat On A Hot Tin Roof" In "Cat On a Hot Tin Roof", by Tennessee Williams, there are a number of rather disturbing themes that reflect on our modern society. These themes, which clearly explain much of the behavior we see in our society today, include the willingness to get what we want by engaging ourselves in backstabbing situations, the tendency of married couples to remain together in unloving relationships, the tendency of materially wealthy people being utterly selfish, and the attempt to escape reality by resorting to alcohol and drugs. In this play one of the most obvious conflicts lies with Gooper and Mae. These two try to discredit Brick and Maggie by portraying themselves to Big Daddy as the most qualified and responsible in managing a large estate. Gooper and Mae cleverly argue that because Brick and Maggie don't have any children they would not have the responsibility of taking good care of the plantation, and due to the fact that Gooper and Mae have five children, they, therefore, claim to be a more responsible family. ...read more.

Middle

Maggie, unwilling to pursue this sort of relationship, tells Brick that she wishes to have a normal loving and sexual relationship with him and until they do she would prefer to remain "a cat on a hot tin roof", being frustrated with the situation hoping that things will change for the better. Brick, on the other hand is rather bitter and cold and expresses his amazement at a woman who wants to have a child with a man who hates her. However, despite his abuse towards her, she decides to stay and live with the one and only man she loves. In the real world today, men continue to abuse and batter women and society apparently does not give this issue the attention it needs. However, because of feelings of helplessness and financial dependence, many women stay married to their husbands, hoping that they can somehow change them. Another conflict we see in this play is the choice of escaping life's many challenges by indulging in alcohol. This sort of behavior comes from Brick, a former sports hero who has become and alcoholic and presently on crutches because of an accident he had while drunk. ...read more.

Conclusion

Throughout "cat on a hot tin roof" the message was made clear that achieving land, money, and power are life's ultimate goals and anything that may stand in the way of obtaining them is unimportant and should be disregarded. Big Daddy's description of the plantation creates this belief and myth that men can escape death by buying all the material things that can bring one self-satisfaction. It isn't difficult to envision a world based on the conflicts portrayed in "cat on a hot tin roof" because it is basically a mirrored representation of the moral conflicts already present in our society today. This day in age people engage themselves in many backstabbing situations, where the only way of escape is by resorting to drugs, alcohol, and material possessions, essentially blocking our paths of obtaining life's more important values. Brick is the perfect example to prove this, as towards the end of the play the conversation between him and his father seems to have expelled the fog that Brick has hidden for so long, and he is ready to confront life at once, instead of hiding and covering up his true feelings. ...read more.

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